tifosi too!

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Posts posted by tifosi too!


  1. This thread needs a title change!

    Keep the ugly ones coming in guys! Excellent stuff ! I hadn't even seen most of them before!

    Such a topic definitely deserves it's own space!

    Just make sure it doesn't go off topic again and we end up with a bunch of pictures of ugly exes!

    Some of those ugly noses brought back memories!!


  2. Look like it's all resolved now, as you can see from Lewis's new helmet design in my signature.......

    Ha ha!! This is absolutely fantastic!!

    Excuse me for quoting Flavio but this bit from his interview was epic:

    But while Button may be in Briatore's good books this week, the same cannot be said for Hamilton and Felipe Massa after their sixth clash of the season in India on Sunday.

    "They make me laugh," he said. "They are like Laurel and Hardy."


  3. The Low Pub has pointed it out, Tif, but you can clearly see Lewis alongside Massa at 6-seconds on that video clip (in fact, it even looks like he gets a nose infront). This was as they went into the braking zone (marked generally by the braking boards (150, 100, 50) on the side of the track). Whilst modern F1 c#ckpits are not great for peripheral viewing due to the high collars on the c#ckpit, Massa will have at least heard the car Lewis next to him. I think this video evidence disputes your point in response to my post regarding Lewis being alongside.

    I didn't say Massa didn't know he was there. It was Hamilton's duty to control his car and avoid contact. In the video I just can't understand how can you see Hamilton next to Massa, especially after seeing clearly he hit the area just in front of his rear wheel.

    In terms of F1 and the Massa penalty, it must be acknowledged that F1 (like all series/classes) have what are termed Supplementary Regulations, or Class Regulations or something along those lines. This could be sporting codes and the like. F1 has a very complicated Sporting Code. Part of that code is the Penalties section, and in this case, the rules used were those pertaining to "avoidable accidents". The stewards will have reflected on this, whilst looking at the footage, and also take into account telemetry, and the nature of the track (which I think is one of the key points, in that the next corner was a right hander, and thus Massa could have taken the left wider than normal then be back on the racing line for the following right hander...in other words, he could have avoided a collision). The other, more telling point, is that, proven by the video footage, Lewis was fully alongside, and Massa will have known he was on his inside "somewhere", and thus should have been prudent on his turn in. Herbert knows this, being an ex-driver of F1, and other classes, because at some time in his career, and certainly not only once, he will have been in Massa's shoes, with someone up his inside to the same degree as Lewis.

    Whilst the following may be from the NZ Standing Regs, the general thought behind it, if not so much the exact wording, is in all reg's around the various FIA sanctioned organisations:

    You may ask, what's that got to do with F1, and the answer is "everything", because it is under rules of this sort that ALL drivers will have raced under on their way up to F1, right from Karting. So it is very much relevant, because the way you handle yourself on a track, or what is expected of you, does not change all of a sudden when you get to F1. This is why I was arguing with Mike that Perez can not be given a "pass" for missing the waved yellows in practise, and must be held liable just as much as Hamilton was being held by Mike for doing the same thing. These guys know the rules, so they can push them.

    "Racing room" is a term not just related to Historics, and believe me when I say this, there are plenty of Historic cars from Formula Junior through to Can Am to Historic F1, still rubbing tyre walls when they are on track. If Martin Brundle doesn't mention the term "racing room" in every third race or so, then I'll be a monkey's uncle.

    So there is no such thing as an 'overlap' rule and therefore no-one can be penalized for violating it, right? Even the stewards or other commenters never used this term so I 'll just leave it at that. The reason I was a bit cynical about it was that it was passed on as 'legislation' of the sport, when in fact it isn't.

    As for your thought of "braking hard enough to avoid the collision", on Lewis' part, I respond thus: The performance of the brakes are directly related to the adhesion of the tyres to the road, the caliper pads to the rotor, and the original inertia of the car. If you think for one minute that an F1 car, traveling about 180-200km (give or take, though seems possible for a 4th/5th gear corner), can come to an abrupt halt, for this is what would be needed in your scenario to avoid a collision, in the space of a few car lengths is preposterous. Granted modern F1 braking efficiency is almost off this planet, but no matter how good they are, they can still not break the laws of cohesion and physics. Your scenario would also imply that all accidents, even by commuter traffic on a motorway, could be avoided by "braking hard", and I think that you will know, even by just all the anecdotal evidence that you will have seen in your own life experiences, that this is not really possible.

    What I meant was that Massa couldn't have known in the meantime between the time he last checked Hamilton's whereabouts and when they came in contact, if Hamilton had been mentally prepared for the scenario where he would have to brake, hard or not, to avoid contact. By 'braking' I mean a series of avoiding measures as a back-up when things don't go as planned. Hamilton had count on Massa taking a trip to the grassier areas perhaps, that's why his overtaking manoeuvre failed.

    (And for your info, I am involved in all this sort of stuff (race incidents, regulations etc) through my Co-Ordinators role for Historic Formula Ford Racing in NZ, where I have to deal with the CRO (Competitor Relations Officer), COC (Clerk of Course), Race Stewards and Marshal's whenever we have a bit too much argie-bargie in our racing.)

    I assure you I have total respect in your knowledge or expertise but we simply have different views on this. I might be a Ferrari fan, but don't mistake this as an attempt to defend Massa or anything. My problem is the way racing on track should be like. So what if Massa got a drive through? Did he lose the championship because of that or anything? My concern is about the rules that can't have been properly interpreted.


  4. You said in your original post - I 'm aware we don't have the evidence the stewards had but I just can't understand how the driver in front can be blamed

    So, we are talking about the matter at hand. Surely, when discussing an incident like this it is acceptable to refer to other similar instances? It is a common practice to try and gain an understanding, even if the incidents are not exactly the same.

    http://news.bbc.co.u...ne/15513318.stm

    He first says he doesn't see him on the left, then he says 'when I see he put the car on my side, I braked on the clean side and he was behind me'

    With all due respect but Massa didn't say what you said:

    Here it is:

    But Massa argued: "My view is that I braked later than him, I was in front, I was on the grippy area and then I started to turn and I don't see him on my left.

    "He is behind and then he touched my rear wheel. To be honest, I don't understand why I have the penalty."

    Isn't this exactly what happened? He meant he didn't see him while he was turning in, which is true. He hit his rear wheel!

    There is an onboard video.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaVaOFDy3C4


  5. Well, what's your assessment on the Webber and Lewis incident in Singapore 2010 then?

    It wasn't exactly the same because it was a slower corner, but in any case I can't see why I should discuss it. Why not talk about the matter at hand?

    I guess you would also have to question why Massa lied at first when he said he didn't see Lewis, only to change his story later and admit he did see Lewis before they came together :whistling:

    Also I don't seem to recall Massa saying he didn't see Hamilton. I didn't read anything like that since the race.


  6. I agree with this guy.

    He doesn't seem to know anything about 'overlaps' though so take what he writes with a grain of salt!

    Analysis: Coulthard backs Massa

    David Coulthard has come out firmly on the side of Felipe Massa over the Indian GP penalty that left anyone with eyes in their head incredulous.

    Thirteen-time GP winner Coulthard, now a TV pundit for BBC television, said immediately after the incident that he feared a penalty for Hamilton.

    "For me it was a racing incident," Coulthard said in his UK Daily Telegraph newspaper column. "At worst I felt Lewis was more to blame. I simply can't understand how Felipe could have been deemed the guilty party.

    "As drivers we are always taught that the car behind is responsible so to my mind the stewards misinterpreted what happened.

    "If Lewis had got that far up alongside Felipe into a tight hairpin, where the braking zone is maybe 100 metres and lasts for a few seconds, then I think Massa would have been right to give way. But heading into a fourth gear left-hander at maybe 150-160km/h? Where the braking zone lasts for one second? I don't think Massa can be held responsible."

    Coulthard added: "It was almost as if they felt that with Lewis receiving so many decisions against him this year, they were trying to redress the balance."

    Johnny Herbert, the driver steward on the FIA panel in India, has said since the race: "The decision to penalise Massa for his contact with Hamilton came down to one simple fact - it could have been avoided. I know Massa was upset by our decision, but I believe we made the right call.

    "After looking at it from different camera angles and studying all the data, it was clear that Massa knew where Hamilton was before he chose to turn across him. There was nothing Hamilton could have done to avoid it. He did try to get out of the move but it was too late."

    There aren't so much holes in Herbert's justification, as craters. Of course it could have been avoided, but why does that make it Massa's fault? Hamilton should have backed out of it much sooner. He shouldn't have still been there when it became clear he wasn't going to make the move stick.

    The key point is Coulthard's comment about the driver behind being responsible. This would appear to be news to a depressingly large number of people posting rubbish on sundry websites and bulletin boards, but is obvious to anyone who has competed in anything beyond the school sack race.

    The fact is that Hamilton almost got alongside Massa early in the run to Turn 5 by deploying KERS. That then ran out and he no longer had the additional momentum that would have brought him fully alongside, as would have occurred had, for example, he had a much better exit from Turn 4.

    Compounding that, Hamilton was on the dirty side of the track, as evidenced by the dust he was kicking up, while Massa went right to take the normal racing line. Those combined factors afforded the Ferrari much more grip and therefore the opportunity to brake later and reclaim the initial ground that Hamilton had made before they reached the turn-in point.

    It is the position of the cars at the turn-in point that matters and as can be clearly seen from video footage of the incident, Hamilton's right front makes contact with Massa's left rear. End of story.

    Forget the personalities involved or any of that, any racing driver who cedes a corner from the position Massa was in, needs to quickly look for an alternative career.

    The reasoning behind such etiquette is simple enough. On the run up a straight to a corner you can jockey for position, check your mirrors, attack, defend, do whetever, but when you reach the turn-in point and commit, you are looking ahead of you.

    A full field of peripheral vision is 180 degrees. Not many have it. For most people it's somewhere between 140 degrees and 180 degrees. And hence, if you are looking ahead and someone is not right alongside you, you are not going to see them. Of course you might know they are there but you are not obliged to accommodate them.

    Hence the existence of the universally accepted rule that the guy behind is responsible. If the guy is all but alongside you, you may in some cases cede, for instance if he's on a grippier bit of road or a better line. But cede position when the guy's front is level with your rear and you are on the racing line? Not a chance.

    Ferrari team principal Stefano Domenicali was humorously ironic when it was pointed out that Hamilton and Massa seemed to be attracted like magnets.

    "Yes," he laughed, "but which one is the positive and which one the negative!"

    He added: "I have to respect the decision of the referee even if I was very surprised. Felipe was ahead at the entrance to the corner and had the line..."

    The situation between the two drivers is starting to go a bit beyond a joke. Thankfully, McLaren's Martin Whitmarsh says it's not the time to stage a hand-shake outside the garage. That would be about as credible as the one between Ron Dennis and Max Mosley at Spa in '07 after Spygate...

    But they probably do need to have a quiet chat and get it sorted. It's all getting a bit tedious even if it is manna for the tabloids.


    1. That now the car in front must give up position if the driver thinks that the driver chasing him may crash into him while trying to overtake? No. All drivers, from early in their careers learn of a rule called "overlap"...if overlap is established going into the braking zone, then one is obliged to hold their line / leave racing room. Lewis had overlap (front wheels up to c#ckpit) as they went into the braking zone, and thus Massa should have kept his line. He did not. Whilst in the first instance it is the overtaking cars duty to pass safely, it is also the being-passed cars duty to acknowledge an overlap and cede. - Alright then, could you provide us with some credible info on this rule and why it's applied here? As far as I 'm concerned the car that is technically behind and has not passed in any way the car in front, does not have the right to pass. Please explain it in detail because the internet doesn't seem to agree with you. All I could find was about sailing boat races. Have you watched the video? From what I saw, Hamilton's car was never even up to c#ckpit but his front wheel was up to Massa's rear wheel. Try to align them in the video and don't be fooled by the angle.
    2. The driver of the car in front must assume the other driver is indeed trying to crash into him in fast corners with little braking rather than pressuring him, especially now with the DRS and KERS where the faster car can literally breeze by in the straight and therefore act based on assumption? That's just dumb. No one goes out to crash into anyone. I've wasted too many letters on responding to this question, so will leave it at that. -You didn't get my point, but maybe the fact I'm not a native English speaker may have something to do with it. By saying "trying to crash into him", I was referring to the end result, as it happened eventually. I said that because Massa was supposedly penalized for causing the collision and supposedly had the intention to cause it.How could he have known Hamilton's intentions??
    3. What if Hamilton decided to brake before they crashed, as he should have? Surely a driver of Hamilton's caliber would have been able to execute such manouvre. So why was Massa acting un-sportingly since he couldn't possibly know if Hamilton was just pushing him hard? F1 cars have phenomenal braking power so Massa should have had to be able to calculate in milliseconds that Hamilton would indeed go for the overtake instead of playing mind games.Was that something he had to be penalized or even blamed for? Hamilton DID brake. He was fully alongside as they entered the braking zone. As he was on the dirtier part of the circuit, he in actuality braked earlier than Massa, and dropped from fully alongside, to the rear three quarters. Herbert is absolutely correct in stating Massa would have known he was there. Why would Massa close the door? A simple gamble in the heat of the moment...remember that this is the same Massa that pulled the same door closing maneuver on Jensen at Australia this year (cast your mind back folks), when Button had the faster car, and as they approached the kink at the rowing club, he too went for the inside line...and Massa shut the door, pushing Jensen into the escape road, with Button exclaiming over the radio that "Massa pushed me off"...Button was latter penalised for cutting the corner...though the only reason he did was because Massa put him there. Fast forward to India, and Massa pulled the same trick, and this time with something on his side...Hamilton not being the flavour of the month with the stewards, and thus more likely to cop a penalty if they hit. I guess he never figured that Herbert actually has eyes (and so too the other stewards). -By saying "brake", I meant of course to brake enough so they wouldn't crash. I believe this is obvious so maybe you need to read it again in a new perspective.
    4. If a driver keeps the racing line and is more than half the car ahead while turning in, does he have to get off line and let the car he is fighting for a position with to pass? This will be an issue in the future. Yes...that is an overlap by the car behind. If they don't, you cause an avoidable accident. Now, if the passing car is only wing to gearbox, then no overlap has been created, and if he then hits the car in front it is his fault, and he is the one causing an avoidable accident...just like Hamilton on Massa in Singapore. -Still I 'd like to know precisely how "ovelap" works before commenting. I wish i had the time to look it up better now but only in a few hours I 'll be able to. Strangely I never heard of such a rule before, favoring a car that hasn't even slightly passed the car ahead. Hamilton was more that half of Massa's car behind.Check it out.
    5. That Massa had intention to cause an accident and had to be penalized? Cars in F1 run very closely many times during a race and each driver is responsible for his actions. The incident happened at a fast corner that cars take in 4th gear, as I read somewhere. Was the overtaking manouvre that well executed that the accident happened because of Massa's actions? Where was he supposed to go, or do? This was a normal passing move by Hamilton, one he has displayed and made more often than any other driver this year, except perhaps that Japanese Cowboy (yeeeeha!!) - that is to say, passed someone OUTSIDE of a DRS zone. Vettel has done one (on Alonso), Webber has done one too (on Alonso), and Jensen did one on Schumi (when funnily enough Hamilton didn't...but that's another story). Where was Massa supposed to go? The answer to that is very, very, very simple...you leave racing room....the corner was a left followed by a quick right...there was more chance of Massa maintaining his position than there was him being passed had he given racing room. Perhaps he was weary of the second kerb and wrecking his suspension, but then...wait....he did that all on his lonesome a few laps latter anyway. In short, Massa was clumsy, and pulled a move that put himself in the firing line, when he so easily could have avoided it by leaving a car width for Hamilton to not hit him....because had he done that, I believe he would not have been passed by Hamilton (due to him being on the inside at the very next corner, and because Lewis had to brake earlier going into the left hand portion of the corner due to being on the dirtier line). -Just read DC's comments and tell me again, regarding this particular incident of course. Leave racing room while battling for position and trying to your best for the team? Is that a proper way to race other that historic cars?
    6. If a driver now shoots down the inside every car he comes across, the car in front must let him pass in order not to cause an accident? No. Because unless you have not established an overlap, then you have not claimed the corner. Like I said, no one goes out just to wreck their cars...this is not sprint cars on a quarter mile dirt track. -As I said before, just inform us properly and we 'll see if you are right.

    I'm sure there are more 'dark spots' on this ruling but I trust you guys to dig them out.

    I 'm aware we don't have the evidence the stewards had but I just can't understand how the driver in front can be blamed. It is called overlap. -See above.


  7. After reading the explanation of the penalty Massa was given, by Johnny Herbert, who was the driver-steward, I remain totally unconvinced and I believe it sets bad precedents for F1.

    Link is here, text below.

    Felipe Massa fully deserved his drive-through penalty at the Indian Grand Prix, according to the driver steward that weekend, Johnny Herbert.

    The former Formula 1 driver is adamant that the Brazilian knew where Lewis Hamilton was, and failed to leave necessary room to avoid an accident, despite Massa claiming innocence.

    The Ferrari driver said immediately after the race, that he didn't understand why he had been punished, firmly placing the blame of long-term rival, Hamilton.

    "I don't understand why I have the penalty," confessed Massa. "I braked later than him, I was in front and on the grippier part of the circuit and I didn’t see him on the left. So he was behind and he touched my rear wheel."

    Writing in his column for The National though, Herbert took the time to explain his reasoning behind the penalty.

    "The decision to penalise Felipe Massa for his contact with Lewis Hamilton came down to one simple fact - it could have been avoided," wrote the 47-year-old.

    "I know Massa was upset by our decision, but I believe we made the right call. After looking at it from different camera angles and studying all the data available to us, it was clear that Massa knew where Hamilton was before he chose to turn across him.

    "There was nothing Hamilton could have done to avoid it. He did try to get out of the move, but it was too late and the contact was made."

    This is not an acceptable reason to give a penalty, in my opinion at least and I 'm pretty sure many people may think otherwise.

    In any case, does that mean...

    1. That now the car in front must give up position if the driver thinks that the driver chasing him may crash into him while trying to overtake?
    2. The driver of the car in front must assume the other driver is indeed trying to crash into him in fast corners with little braking rather than pressuring him, especially now with the DRS and KERS where the faster car can literally breeze by in the straight and therefore act based on assumption?
    3. What if Hamilton decided to brake before they crashed, as he should have? Surely a driver of Hamilton's caliber would have been able to execute such manouvre. So why was Massa acting un-sportingly since he couldn't possibly know if Hamilton was just pushing him hard? F1 cars have phenomenal braking power so Massa should have had to be able to calculate in milliseconds that Hamilton would indeed go for the overtake instead of playing mind games.Was that something he had to be penalized or even blamed for?
    4. If a driver keeps the racing line and is more than half the car ahead while turning in, does he have to get off line and let the car he is fighting for a position with to pass? This will be an issue in the future.
    5. That Massa had intention to cause an accident and had to be penalized? Cars in F1 run very closely many times during a race and each driver is responsible for his actions. The incident happened at a fast corner that cars take in 4th gear, as I read somewhere. Was the overtaking manouvre that well executed that the accident happened because of Massa's actions? Where was he supposed to go, or do?
    6. If a driver now shoots down the inside every car he comes across, the car in front must let him pass in order not to cause an accident?

    I'm sure there are more 'dark spots' on this ruling but I trust you guys to dig them out.

    I 'm aware we don't have the evidence the stewards had but I just can't understand how the driver in front can be blamed.


  8. It's a damned-sight closer to a sport than anything else out there, but yes, all racing is a sport-like game now.

    That's beside the point (or is it 'besides' the point? I'm never quite sure...)

    I'll seriously answer your question. From what I know of you, excellence isn't the only qualification for you supporting a team or driver. There's gotta be something more to it. Some bit of personality that can carry your support through the tough times that inevitably happen.

    So.

    Teams.

    I don't recommend supporting any team. The image a team projects is very dependent on the driver's they hire and that changes every few years. If you must support a team, my pick for you is McLaren. They're no more dishonest and cheating than their competitors (despite the Ferrari issues of a few years ago...which a smart person would correctly recognize as being the fault of a few persons, not the team as a whole), they have a distinguished pedigree of wins, they have an impressive history of unique drivers, and they aren't dominating the sport 100%. They have ups and downs. I suppose you should try to catch some BBC coverage (pre and post race) to hear Whitmarsh interviewed. BBC have a good relationship with a few teams, McLaren being one of them, and you get a feel, race after race, for the warp and weave of a team just by them being interviewed throughout the season. But all this is only a half-hearted attempt to point you towards a team. As I have said, I don't suggest you follow a team unless your chosen driver is employed by them. That leads me to....

    Drivers.

    Here's where the rubber meets the road. This is the business end of a race car. You can really get behind the drivers in a way you can never do with a team. Most people here on this forum would expect me to suggest Hamilton. Truthfully, there's no reason why you shouldn't support him. He's dynamic in the car and races with a brass set of balls. I can forgive the teenage hip-hop image just to see him shoot for the gap every other Sunday. But I don't see him as 'your' driver.

    So.

    So.

    Kamui Kobayashi. Cowboy-ashi himself. This kid is the genuine deal. The complete McNugget combo with a Super Size of win. He's got a humble personality (BBC coverage, you gotta get this) and he drives like a bat out of hell. He defends his position with grace and passes opponents in ways reminiscent of Hamilton and JPM but without the drama. His driving style is clean and his racing is clean as well. As close to a gentleman racer as you can get. He combines the fluid, gentlemanly approach of Button with the brass balls of Hamilton. He never complains or whines when bad luck or the team's mistakes hit him. He never makes excuses when he f ucks up. If you watch the BBC coverage, Brundle, who is cynical and critical of even the best drivers, rarely has anything bad to say about Cowboyashi. In fact, Brundle has shown open delight when talking about him.

    Perhaps the biggest reason to support the young Japanese driver is this: Where so many drivers have went into the last corner of Montreal too hot and have hit the 'wall of champions', Kamui, who also went in too hot, aimed his car like a missile towards the apex, pulled out his Big Balls, kept his foot planted, and drifted away from the wall, arse-end hanging out and almost sideways. I swear I saw Gilles behind the wheel for a moment. Anyone who can invoke the memory of Gilles is worthy of support.

    As a team supporter, I tend to disagree!!

    I started watching F1 because I wanted to see Ferraris racing, well back in the day that is.

    I believe teams are the heart of the sport and unless you are a Ferrari fan or seriously support a team for any reason, then this may be hard to understand!

    I guess if you view F1 from a driver-oriented perspective, then you are bound to fall out of love with the sport.

    To put it simply, I just want Ferrari to win every race and have the fastest drivers!! Many years may pass and many drivers will come and go, but I can always hope to see the team do well in the next GP, or hire the best driver in the field and try to get out of the midfield. I don't know if I 'll ever get tired of this, but I'm just as interested in the technical aspects of the sport, for which the team has to take the credit, not to take out the driver input or contribution.

    I'm too much in a hurry to explain this well enough, but I 'll be back!!!


  9. i've heard hamilton was naughty again

    Just the usual race weekend for him!

    He really should try to get his head together! He doesn't seem to pay much attention to other drivers.

    I don't think he is being overly selfish or something, just that something is wrong with him. I think he needs a break!


  10. Top Gear did a feature on a new offer from Lotus (can't remember which one) where for a mere £400K p.a. you get the regular opportunity to have a personal F1 package/drive which includes tuition from Jean Alesi....

    I liked him...

    Although I still smile when I think of the time he ran out of fuel....

    400k meaning 400 000 English pounds??

    I bet he would let me live in his house for quite some time for that amount of money!

    And he would have to bring me breakfast in bed!!

    We 'd set up some playstation races that would only become regular if I could beat him and then come here to gloat!!


  11. Well, it's all been downhill since Alesi....

    I remember watching Alesi and Berger in despair, hoping for a good result...!!

    I was a massive fan of his and I believe he was one of the very best in F1, but somehow the results didn't follow his amazing skills!!

    Gerhard Berger was a spectacular driver back in the day as well, as I'm sure you remember!!


  12. This thread is excellent Mike! Congratulations!!

    I haven't been here as an active member for years I believe, but it wasn't on purpose!!

    Really a lot have happened since I joined this forum but that would make a long story!

    The month/year I joined points to a point in my past where I was horribly disappointed by a -then girl- who is hopefully -now a 28 year old potato sack- having "gravity issues" and other things I no longer bother to even think because, well, I 've changed a lot since then!

    Relationships came and gone since then and I 'd like to believe I 've grown a thicker skin nowadays and judge people based on their actions, rather than the things they say or claim.

    This forum and the opportunity to discuss F1 with people from around the world was very helpful and exciting for me back then and may well still be! I remember joining this forum to defend MS and having quite a task around here, but it was good fun!

    These days I'm way too busy with my job and the office environment, bosses monitoring the web traffic, etc keep me away from commenting on this site but I don't think there was even a single day where I didn't came here for the news and check out what you guys write! Since MS retired the forum became less spicy though and it still is because, even though he is back, something still is not the same and I bet he would agree as well :P !!

    I got the chance to try my hand in a number of things and karting is definitely at the top of my list of hobbiesI 'm lucky to have competitive friends and everytime we race we have a thriller in our hands. The last time we went to the track there were less than 0.150 separating 4 drivers in race fastest laps! And we are all 30+ so we go there for serious racing.

    Apart from pursuing hobbies and buying a couple of cars, not much have changed. I live in an apartment, which I rent.

    Being single most of the time, I haven't really thought of buying a house, but I guess it will be on the cards in a few years.

    I don't really look much older than back then, so no shocking discoveries here!!Quitting smoking, watching my weight and regular training help me feel great and I don't think age is that important if you learn to listen to yourself.

    I don't know if I 'll get to become a regular poster again, but I 'll be sure to drop in sometimes!


  13. Note that only his hand is immobilized. He walks almost normally and both knees are bending just fine.

    This one is indeed a much view of his overall condition.

    He seems to be lively and on top of the situation, judging from his body language!

    If only his body can do him the favor and heal completely or at least well enough, he can be up there again!!

    I sure hope so!


  14. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hD8T8_JR4Mw

    Hamilton was really p**sed off. I don't blame him but that joke about racism was stupid.

    I know I haven't been commenting here for quite a while, but I always lurk around!

    Looks like work got the best of me, but maybe I should try to find my way back here!!

    Anyway, regarding Hamilton's interview, I imagine the whole thing with the stewards went a little like this but he was too angry to sing it to us:

    I heard "Son do you know why I'm stoppin' you for?"

    -Cause I'm young and I'm black and my hats real low?

    Do I look like a mind reader sir, I don't know

    Am I under arrest or should I guess some mo'?

    -"Well you was doin fifty-five in a fifty-fo' "

    -I got 99 problems but a championship ain't one..