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Malaysain Gp Race Thread

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I have a Ubuntu machine and quite like it, but too much digging around at the Command Line for this ever to be my full time machine.

In the past I'd have agreed with you that Linux was too tricky to be worth it whereas nowadays you can use it just like Windows if you want to, with the graphical interface. Installing and configuring it, and updating or installing new software used to be such a hassle but now it's just the same in Ubuntu as in Windows, as far as I can see anyway. What do you use the command line for? I find it very useful for complicated/repetitive editing.

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yep - as murray says - there are plenty of updater/unpacker/aplication indexing/all singing/all dancing OS controller aps now. on kubuntu, the default package is called adept, but there are plenty of others. basically does all the command line stuff for you.

on the other hand, I quite like doing things from kommand since I really like to know exactly what's going on with my computer. but for ex-windows users the switch over is easier than ever.

each to their own though - some people will always prefer windows - that's fair enough - it's not completely without it's benefits.

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For once, we agree. But it still proves my point, that a car represents 80% of any driver's success. Look at Massa, Raikkonen and Hamilton this year.

I agree, to a point. Yes, it's a lot to do with the car, but the fact he managed to step up so quickly and comprehensively outdo his teammate after years of being in the doldrums still impresses me.

Psychologically he must have gone through a lot of torment, and I think he's dealt with that in a way that many other drivers wouldn't.

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I agree, to a point. Yes, it's a lot to do with the car, but the fact he managed to step up so quickly and comprehensively outdo his teammate after years of being in the doldrums still impresses me.

Psychologically he must have gone through a lot of torment, and I think he's dealt with that in a way that many other drivers wouldn't.

Ok, Oli-don't get all mushy on me, but I have to agree again. I must be getting soft in my old age...

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For decades, the Twin Ports' economic landscape was planted firmly in big business such as manufacturing, shipping, and mining. Although these trades are still vital to our economy, today's technological advances are sowing the seeds of a new entrepreneurism that is allowing more people to jump the corporate ship and test the waters of going into business for themselves. Home-based businesses in our region have emerged from the shadows in recent years and proven that they can have a measurable impact on a local economy. We spoke with several area home-based business people about why this impact will continue to grow in coming years. In addition to offering tips on how to start a home-based business, they also explain why membership in the Chamber of Commerce is even more important to those who go it alone. Mark Anthony, president of the Home-Based Business Association of Minnesota, operates an extremely infon-native web site on the subject (www.hbba.org). Anthony believes that Duluth is ripe for more home-based businesses. He says, "Duluth and the Iron Range are explosive right now in regard to this trend. We've had a lot of inquirie from the area." Anthony says that a bias once attached to this type of business is eroding. wow power leveling,

"There is still a stigma with home-based businesses among dyed in the wool corporates," begins Anthony. "Just five years ago, it was like pulling teeth to get someone to admit that they worked out of the home. Now, it's become almost a status symbol." Perhaps the image of home-based busi ness is improving because more people are realizing that its contribution to the community is no nickel and dime matter. "Home-based business people spend their money locally and it adds up to thousands annually," says Anthony. "Cities need to encourage these businesses, because they help sustain a local tax base." One local entrepreneur who agrees that these businesses are vital to the economy's health is Ken Nebel, of K.H. Nebel Associates, d/b/a Nebel Financial Services. "If you look at the statistics, businesses that employ one to five people represent a huge segment of the economy," he states. "A lot of these businesses are home-based. We are lucky here, because we don't have the zoning restrictions and other obstacles that home-based business faces in the Cities." Nebel affirms that home-based business people are strongly committed to their communities and prove that with their spending habits. He says, "I've found that Samls Club has terrific deals on office equipment. Sam's Club is the home-based-business supplier for Duluth. Its manager, Jim Caesar, another Chamber memher, is very supportive of the small businessperson." John Pegg started the Entrepreneurs' Connection organization in Duluth two years ago. "We are definitely growing," Pegg says. "We have about 100 people on our mailing list and I continue to meet more people who are looking for more options." Home-based businesses are also changing how larger companies operate. Mary Smestad owns Positive Solutions, and is a customer service consultant. She points out that more corporations are turning to contract services to protect their bottom line. "It's a great selling point for my business," explains Smestad, "To tell a company that, by hiring me on a short-term basis, they save money on taxes, annual salary and benefits. I think home-based businesses in Duluth will really take off when more companies learn the benefits of using their services." All of our contacts agree that Chamber membership is not just for storefront businesses and large corporations. "The smaller the business, the more important Chamber participation is," says Ken Nebel. "My best clients came from referrals from other Chamber members." Mary Smestad adds, "The networking is so important, and so is the education about other companies. It's also a great morale boost for me - the Chamber is sort of my cheerleader." If you are considering starting your own business, heed the seasoned advice of those who have gone before you: get informed and be prepared. "You're going to be blindsided some months, no matter how good your business plan looks on paper," says Smestad who attended classes at The University of Minnesota Duluth's (UMD) Center for Business Development before starting Positive Solutions. "All of the freedom - flexible schedule, being in charge of my own destiny - comes with a price; you're giving up the security of that monthly paycheck. Discipline and selfmotivation are key. For every day you take off, there's an 18-hour day to make up for it. Know there's a big learning curve at first; learning when the slow months will occur, so the next year, you can plan ways to fill those gaps." Smestad says that the classes at UMD and at Lake Superior College provided her with excellent preparation and support. Beth Travis-Betts, owner of Art Direction and Advertising agrees. "I took small-business classes at UMD and at Lake Superior College. You learn how to determine profit and loss statements, how to mark-up a world of warcraft power levelin, product, how to register with the State as a business, and how to handle tax issues. In fact, the instructor actually comes to your house once a month for the first year to assist you with start-up." Travis-Betts explains why education is so important to a home-based business. "One gets pretty isolated working at home, and these days you have to keep up with new technology to stay competitive." She also offers a little advice on how to create a business image without spending a lot of money. "The phone company has resources such as market extension lines. They allow you to have two numbers, a residential and business phone number, with only one phone line. That way, you r business can be listed in the Yellow Pages. Home-based businesses have sparked entire industries that cater to them. Use the Internet to find better rates on fax lines, phone systems, and other tools." Marge Johnson has operated a management consulting firm out of her North Shore home for four years. She stresses the importance of research to would-be entrepreneurs. "Be sure there is market demand for what you're doing. Does the market need your service?" asks Johnson. "I interviewed other consultants and potential customers before starting my business." Again, all of our contacts concur that involvement with the Chamber is crucial to building business. Says Johnson, "The Chamber provides the most current, succinct information about the local business climate. It's a critical place to meet potential clients." Beth Travis-Betts notes, "It's where I get most of my business." In addition to referrals from Chamber members, Mary Smestad started building a clientele with a letter-writing campaign. "I wrote a lot of letters to past contacts from my previous job and asked for referrals." "People buy from people they know," quips Arlene Soden, a local business development consultant and home-based business owner. Entreprenuerism is part of America's heritage and today's technology-based economy is allowing more people to realize their dream of working for themselves. Many believe that the future of the home-based business culture in Duluth is taking shape right before our eyes on a construction site located in the old downtown. Mark Anthony comments, "With the new Soft Center coming to Duluth, home-based businesses will be called upon to help develop software that will place businesses, both large and small, on the cutting edge of technology and help transform this area into a major telecommuting center." [9 Julie Munson is a freelance writer in Duluth.

Home-based businesses take root in the Northland

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yep - as murray says - there are plenty of updater/unpacker/aplication indexing/all singing/all dancing OS controller aps now. on kubuntu, the default package is called adept, but there are plenty of others. basically does all the command line stuff for you.

on the other hand, I quite like doing things from kommand since I really like to know exactly what's going on with my computer. but for ex-windows users the switch over is easier than ever.

each to their own though - some people will always prefer windows - that's fair enough - it's not completely without it's benefits.

Damn spammers (not you, the previous post). Anyhoo...

I'm quite experienced in using Linux, so know all about package managers. Yes you are right to a point, but you can't get away from the command line - adding a printer is a good example, horrendous. Or when I tried to update OpenOffice 2.4 to 3.0 .... and don't get me started on getting wireless working in the current version....

But, I do like Ubuntu - its pretty good; been playing with Ubuntu Studio lately; I don't like Windows and I still prefer my Mac :D

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I'm quite experienced in using Linux, so know all about package managers. Yes you are right to a point, but you can't get away from the command line - adding a printer is a good example, horrendous. Or when I tried to update OpenOffice 2.4 to 3.0 .... and don't get me started on getting wireless working in the current version....

But, I do like Ubuntu - its pretty good; been playing with Ubuntu Studio lately; I don't like Windows and I still prefer my Mac :D

True - the printer example - can be a pain.

Although I've found that getting networking going is a lot easier than in windows. Using a PC with 2 nics on a windows home network - **** me.

Using Kubuntu (KDE desktop - Adept) I've updated open-office without any problems. Strange.

I tend to prefer the KDE environment - GNOME doesn't seem as usable to me - don't really know why.

EDIT - Oh yes - and Macs do do a lot of things way better. The hardware from the get go was (and remains) simply more sensible. The internal architecture of macs opens itself to true multi-tasking - shame Apple weren't as savvy in their formative years as they are now.

Edited by adamstrags

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Parts of the British media are reporting that it was Schumi that made the call to change Kimi's tyres.

If so, how wrong did he get it.

I find that Ferrari are being total asshats for letting this assumption (it has been neither confirmed or denied) flourish. Stefano Dumbenicali better get his head on straight about all of this. I'm sure Ferrari are trying to skate under the radar now, considering a lot of attention is on Mclaren but honestly Ferrari look like fools right now; letting a 7 time WDC take the blame for a tire choice decision is totally bush league. How about if someone actually running the team steps up and says, "yeah my bad. You're right we look like amatuers. Now we're gonna pull our collective heads out of our asses and figure out how to actually finish some races." That would be brilliant, Ferrari. Thanks.

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7 is definately more solid than Vista, but be warned - PnP and driver support is still woefully lacking - it will improve with time. plus - wait until a few more hackers get their grubby mits on it. IE 8 was cracked (with embarrassing ease) the week before microsoft's grand release - oops. I suspect the same for windows 7 soon enough - microsoft's networking is consistently a long way from airtight. They assume that being propretary keeps them safe - they still haven't learnt.

Vista releases now are way WAY better than when it first came out (they basically launched way too early), but still hoovers up resources. If you like pretty, then great. If you want a functioning/non-crashing/speedy machine then skip it.

Best option IMO - A linux kernal. I recommend Kubuntu or Ubuntu. Way more secure and really simple to use once you get the hang of it.

It's simple logic - if the source code to an OS/app is open to the public, then it must be secure. Second - if we let all programmers look at, improve our code and write aps themselves then they will be way more efficient and usable. Hey presto open-source s##ts on proprietary stuff from microsoft and their ilk.

Oh - the race?

Yep - would have liked it longer, but thems the breaks. 2pm start and less likelyhood of rain might be preferable. I wonder how many times bernie's heard that this weekend.

I see you posted this before your latest flipout so it is a given you won't be able to process any of this now but, what the heck, others may benefit from the info...

Driver support is not really a big problem. If your machine runs Vista, it is likely to run 7. That has been my experience with every Vista machine that I've upgraded so far. The only problem I've heard of (from others) is a missing DVD driver during install. But I haven't had that problem because I install from a USB which I recommend to _everyone_.

Linux is like Mac, some people will use it, most won't. Vista is no reason to move on and certainly Linux is no reason to move in... yet.

Open-source? Sure. It's great in some areas. No need to paint your face and run for the think of the jungle, though.

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I find that Ferrari are being total asshats for letting this assumption (it has been neither confirmed or denied) flourish. Stefano Dumbenicali better get his head on straight about all of this. I'm sure Ferrari are trying to skate under the radar now, considering a lot of attention is on Mclaren but honestly Ferrari look like fools right now; letting a 7 time WDC take the blame for a tire choice decision is totally bush league. How about if someone actually running the team steps up and says, "yeah my bad. You're right we look like amatuers. Now we're gonna pull our collective heads out of our asses and figure out how to actually finish some races." That would be brilliant, Ferrari. Thanks.

True.

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You're no fun anymore..... B)

Well, post something stupid again and it's off to the races...

:naughty:

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Ferrari are to change their pit personal for China.

Chris Dyer is to return to the pitwall, with Luca Baldisserri now back in the factory.

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Ferrari are to change their pit personal for China.

Chris Dyer is to return to the pitwall, with Luca Baldisserri now back in the factory.

Is that bad?

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Is that bad?

Sounds good news to me. Now they only need to replace Domenicali and it's beginning to look good again.

I thought Dyer is also Kimi's race engineer.

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Is that bad?

Trouble started when Italians took over all the management jobs in the team...

I guess it is good news that someone non-Italian is promoted.

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What's wrong with italians in the pits?

Oh hang on - just remembered mister head banger in Brazil last year. Way to stay unemotional.

Edited by adamstrags

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What's wrong with italians in the pits?

The women's are hairy.

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The women's are hairy.

..

Edited by Bernie Ecclestone

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The women's are hairy.

As long as they shave their legs...

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