Sakae

Silly Season

749 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, Sakae said:

28 November 2017   10:27 (CET)

That's one way to look at it. I do see it however in NASA analogy. Not too many, and only the best of the best will do. 10 to 14 best cars over 35 mediocre ones.

Alonso and Webber started with Minardi, and in a sense the same could be said of Vettel, Schumacher had his first race with a not so good Jordan, etc. Very few drivers are as lucky as Hamilton and start their career with the best team

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49 minutes ago, Publius Cornelius Scipio said:

Alonso and Webber started with Minardi, and in a sense the same could be said of Vettel, Schumacher had his first race with a not so good Jordan, etc. Very few drivers are as lucky as Hamilton and start their career with the best team

28 November 2017   12:52 (CET)

You need to have F2 acting as a prep-system where Minardi, Williams, Toro Rosso, McLaren and a few others getting ready, and just as only the very best of best are admitted into Tokyo University, so should be those who qualify at the top of their class in F2 should be accepted as candidates into an elite group F1 seats (should be) representing. Then you can claim the F1 drivers are (most likely) the very best, and WDC/WCC aren't not some arbitrary fakes decided by rigged system. Anyway, that would be my approach. Marusia and alike are Tier 2 teams. They should act like that, instead some pretentious, silly stand they do equal multinationals on global stage.

I remember a football system, which was constituted by 2 top national leagues. At the end of each season last two teams in Group A were automatically demoted into Group B, and two best teams in that Group B moved into Group A for following season. It worked beautifully. F1 could learn of it.

Edited by Sakae

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From an American perspective.....as long as F1 appears to be elitist, a sport for plutocrats only....it will have a hard time penetrating the market. Part of the reason that NASCAR has done so well here and replaced everything (including Indy Car, which for some decades was a larger, more significant series than F1), is that is comes off as identifying with the common man. Someone like Lewis Hamilton appeals more to Americans because of his upbringing that someone like Nico Rosberg. There is a still a bias here for a scrapper that works his way to the top. In the end, as I happen to be very American, the arguments that Sakae and Lipstick79 make simply do not register with me. In fact, they strike me as fundamentally elitist and immoral (and I would be more than willing to pontificate on the fundamental immorality of elitism...but that might get a little tiresome). That is the American in me, and American culture is notably different in some ways from its western European roots, and even more so from many other cultures.

So.....we need more cars in F1 so more "normal" people can have a chance.

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IMHO the FIA should publish the technical rules for F1 cars then everyone should be able to enter the whole champioship by paying a (reasonable) entry fee. On top of that if I have a superlicence and a car compliant with the F1 regulations I should be able to turn up at a single event, pay an entry fee (higher than the pro-quota part of the entry fee payable for the whole championship) and try to qualify, if I can't qualify I'll have lost a lot of money and it will be my problem only. I just don't understand why in pure sporting terms we have to live with a system where only a set number of entrants are allowed, this system is there for one reason and that is to give a monetary value to something that should have no monetary value in itself, the team's entry. In a nutshell it's a bit of a scam. And it never prevented F1 from sinking even lower than the Andrea Mode debacle (you just have to think of Sauber with Van der Garde or the Arrows' saga).

the fact that drivers need an F1 superlicence and that building a car in compliance with F1 rules is both difficult and expensive is in itself a barrier to entry, but it is a fair barrier, you "graduate" to F1 from junior formulae, nowadays teams buy their way into F1 

Edited by Publius Cornelius Scipio

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2 hours ago, Ruslan said:

From an American perspective.....as long as F1 appears to be elitist, a sport for plutocrats only....it will have a hard time penetrating the market. Part of the reason that NASCAR has done so well here and replaced everything (including Indy Car, which for some decades was a larger, more significant series than F1), is that is comes off as identifying with the common man. Someone like Lewis Hamilton appeals more to Americans because of his upbringing that someone like Nico Rosberg. There is a still a bias here for a scrapper that works his way to the top. In the end, as I happen to be very American, the arguments that Sakae and Lipstick79 make simply do not register with me. In fact, they strike me as fundamentally elitist and immoral (and I would be more than willing to pontificate on the fundamental immorality of elitism...but that might get a little tiresome). That is the American in me, and American culture is notably different in some ways from its western European roots, and even more so from many other cultures.

So.....we need more cars in F1 so more "normal" people can have a chance.

28 November 2017   17:44 (CET)

Way how I see GP (or F1) is pure, free of hypocrisy and ambiguity. Worst what FOM/FOG have done is wanting to have it both ways, and suddenly life became unnecessarily complicated. GP started long time ago as a game of privileged and before a car salesman from England showed up. GP prior F1 was new way to kill time which was mainly in focus of manufacturers and elitists who marketed their brand to those with high income who could purchase automobile some 100 years ago. Do we need to go further with that?

You can have many cars, and low cost racing, but then it is not what some of us expect of true GP (or F1 today). There are far too many cheap venues on the scene already. GP must stay in many ways unique and out of reach for most to survive. Multinationals are those who can carry that tradition into future.

Edited by Sakae

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On ‎11‎/‎28‎/‎2017 at 10:32 AM, Publius Cornelius Scipio said:

IMHO the FIA should publish the technical rules for F1 cars then everyone should be able to enter the whole champioship by paying a (reasonable) entry fee. On top of that if I have a superlicence and a car compliant with the F1 regulations I should be able to turn up at a single event, pay an entry fee (higher than the pro-quota part of the entry fee payable for the whole championship) and try to qualify, if I can't qualify I'll have lost a lot of money and it will be my problem only. I just don't understand why in pure sporting terms we have to live with a system where only a set number of entrants are allowed, this system is there for one reason and that is to give a monetary value to something that should have no monetary value in itself, the team's entry. In a nutshell it's a bit of a scam. And it never prevented F1 from sinking even lower than the Andrea Mode debacle (you just have to think of Sauber with Van der Garde or the Arrows' saga).

the fact that drivers need an F1 superlicence and that building a car in compliance with F1 rules is both difficult and expensive is in itself a barrier to entry, but it is a fair barrier, you "graduate" to F1 from junior formulae, nowadays teams buy their way into F1 

Well said, just to re-emphasize: "I just don't understand why in pure sporting terms we have to live with a system where only a set number of entrants are allowed..."

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On ‎11‎/‎28‎/‎2017 at 11:44 AM, Sakae said:

28 November 2017   17:44 (CET)

Way how I see GP (or F1) is pure, free of hypocrisy and ambiguity.

Really.....since when has F1 been pure, free of hypocrisy and ambiguity?

 

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6 hours ago, Ruslan said:

Really.....since when has F1 been pure, free of hypocrisy and ambiguity?

 

If is not, then it should be.

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30 November 2017   14:31 (CET)

Quote

Williams still looking beyond Kubica for 2018 seat - Lowe

 Does this needs any comments?

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Dr. Marko - a friend/sometimes foe of his countryman Nicki Lauda - revealed that Mercedes approached Vettel and Verstappen to join them. Both drivers refused. 

I am not sure about timing of this invitation. Replace Hamilton of Bottas?

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I thought the rumor of the day was Ricciardo was going to Mercedes, Sainz to Red Bull, Alonso to Renault and Bottas to McLaren.

Wonder what the rumor will be tomorrow?
 

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6 April 2018, 12:32 (CEST) - Rumor this weekend: DR signed a Letter of Intent with Ferrari. RBR gave him a deadline for resigning with them next month. This could spell end of Kimi (with Ferrari). Vettel has contract.

Edited by Sakae

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Well, DR at Ferrari teaming with Vettel will be interesting. So who goes to Mercedes?

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Lovely.

Quote

Hamilton to reject Mercedes contract: Damon Hill

Its hard to stay polite over subject and tone of this article.

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It is a little strange that LH hasn't renewed contract with Mercedes. I just don't see where he could go. I doubt that Vettel will have him at Ferrari. Mercedes might not be as strong as Ferrari this season. But that could be back to normal next year.

Edited by Robert Rick

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4 minutes ago, Robert Rick said:

It is a little strange that LH hasn't renewed contract with Mercedes. I just don't see where he could go. I doubt that Vettel will have him at Ferrari. Mercedes might not be as strong as Ferrari this season. But that might be back to normal next year.

The guy might retire

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Sounds like this guy has massive sense of entitlement whilst not too keen for team re-building, and weathering it up. Suffering from meltdown so early in the season just after 2 races and one wobbly qualification?

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We all know that he is only good when the team and the car is great. Any adversity, he frowns and meltdown. That's how Rosberg got the trophy, by doing mind games and rattling him.

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