lipstick79

Embarrassing

69 posts in this topic


5 hours ago, lipstick79 said:

The POINT in the above ^^^ Post IS ???

Point is, there is nothing substantive to discus here from my side about Ferrari's alleged games with fuel, unless concrete evidence emerges. Next to admission by someone in red suit, FiA is the only one external organ which can speak authoritatively on that subject, yet everyone from that group is quiet. On several other bulletin boards imagination runs rampant on dark side about this subject, I am however not going to accuse Ferrari from cheating, as some others do. There are other plausible technical explanations related to degradation of performance. Fuel related audit on red cars was performed, nothing sensational came out of it, and now is time to move on.  

Edited by Sakae

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Just read a comment regarding Renault:
They R half pregnant - U R either pregnant OR not pregnant HOW can U B half pregnant ?
That IS Y Red Bull HAVE gone 2 Honda - Honda knows what it MUST do, but will it B able??
Renault IS neither or - HAS been that way for some time now.
Back in the day of the Alonso glory years for Renault - SEEMS the impossible
But it is only impossible until it IS done

Edited by lipstick79

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In ref. to Renault, I am holding back on any forecast to where they are heading. Especially now when Brexit is presumed as done deal. It seems Renault let themselves down this year, I have no doubt about it. With Carlos Ghosn's departure (reminds me of Ferrari), force behind got muted, and new big telephone numbers -- Jean-Dominique Senard as chairman and Ghosn’s former deputy Thierry Bolloré -- are question marks in terms of formulating technology of future. Probably not as much what, but how to get there. From some sketchy reports both men are not very found of F1 (as it is today). Time will tell.

No-one from the group Mercedes, Ferrari, Honda, Renault or RBR are on board yet 100% for continuation beyond 2020, and may withdraw anytime. Anyone who thinks people are hungry to stay in that mess F1 is today are deluding themselves. Problem is, not all news about negotiations is public, and tabloid F1 media and lackey websites can be ignored with their insidious opinions. We have to wait for real news, which means, confirmation signatures on the bottom line.

Edited by Sakae

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6 hours ago, Sakae said:

 Mercedes, Ferrari, Honda, Renault or RBR

RBR technically IS Honda, well what were formally Torro Roso

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That's true, however as you surely know, ownership is different, and therefore decision whether to continue beyond 2020 is done independently in different boardrooms. Point I was making, that a decision by one may or may not necessarily mean their partner will follow.  

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Point I was making, that a decision by one may or may not necessarily mean their partner will follow.

If Honda DO leave AGAIN.
WHERE does that leave RBR ?
Put ALL their egg`s in the Honda basket.
Burned bridges with Renault

Edited by lipstick79

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All good questions, however I think while Honda is not 100% on board (yet), they would prefer to stay. That's my feeling. Technology thrust and promotion might perhaps sway them to follow the trend, especially if all money will move to electrics. Regarding RBR, well there is always the option Horner dropping on his knees and pleading for mercy. We should also not forget RB on several occasions declared, that unless conditions after 2020 aren't to their liking, they too will leave series. Admittedly I am not paying too much attention to Horner and Co. therefore I am not sure how seriously they meant all threats.

On the side note, as rhetorical question, intent to leave is one thing, but on pragmatic level, who will buy all those abandoned teams left behind? Huge investments were made, and dumping it means huge losses. With budgetary restrictions a lot of people will look for new jobs, as teams cannot keep everyone employed.

What's with McLaren? Are they closing the door?

Edited by Sakae

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What's with McLaren? Are they closing the door?

>Back when Ron WERE running the show.
Ron had a dream - the British Ferrari, Formula 1 team, and road car.  
Ron ACHIEVED the dream, B 4 being outstead.
There is NO passion anymore within Mclaren 2 B the BEST.
The failed Honda project, could have moved Mclaren BACK to the TOP of F1.
Though the Japanese did NOT deliver what were hoped.
Renault have just stabilised and brought reliability. 
If U do the same as everybody else, U will B the same as everybody else.
 

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6 minutes ago, lipstick79 said:

...

If U do the same as everybody else, U will B the same as everybody else.
 

Well, isn't this exactly what Liberty is pushing on teams, being the same (uniformity)? Take most recent case of Ferrari; obviously they haven't broke any laws (FiA has not charge them), yet as soon as they become innovative and got chance to get ahead, all he~~ broke loose in paddock and F1 tabloid press. 

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On 31/12/2019 at 7:52 PM, Sakae said:

Well, isn't this exactly what Liberty is pushing on teams, being the same (uniformity)?

Where IS the competition in THAT ??
 

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Good question for Liberty and FiA. I didn't say I like what happened to Ferrari (alleged fuelgate). As apparent for some time, I am in the column which believes that F1 is heading wrong direction with their current regulatory and commercial policies.

E-series is probably a winer here. Brawn let me down.

Edited by Sakae

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Well, the Ferrari controversy was because they had figured out a way to bypass the fuel flow monitor. This does not have a whole lot to do with the bigger question of what should be regulated and what should not be regulated.

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Over time it has become obvious to everyone, that there is no such thing as foolproof regulations. Since series inception, teams sought compliance with regulations, yet deviate from everyone else in how to interpret facts. That's true F1 DNA.

If you want to prevent exceptionalism, then you have to create standardise series, and we pretty much heading to that point, and get a new name for it. I can think of one such suitable name - "Former F1 series". 

US conservative essayist Dr. George Will once said, paraphrasing, "there is no point to make laws, that you cannot enforce". I think you cannot put lid on man's desire to better himself and improve. That is one of the tenets FiA ought to be well advised to keep on their minds. (Not they would listen.)

Edited by Sakae

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Indeed Sakae, I TOTALLY agree.
But to paraphrase Ron Denis; 
     Second IS first of the losers

Formula 1 WILL always be, a WINNER (in the current format - a format that we KNOW - AND love).
However anything ELSE would just, come SECOND (first of the losers).

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Teams come and go. It was always that way. It would be useful if some teams on weaker side realize that, and stop dragging everybody else to abyss. Much had changed for their benefit in recent years, and I doubt towards better. Regulations should not choke competitive spirit in technical field to death.

Drivers expressed their doubt that latest changes to car aero will lead to better racing, but what do they know...(/sarcasm off). Problem is, it will take a few years to prove who is right; them, or some nameless individuals in the background who put their stamp onto a design. I am one of those who believe in design and it's validation on the track with real cars running in close proximity by top shelve drivers capable providing objective feedback. I am not aware of any real track time that was implemented in London's offices.To make things even more "interesting", then comes in last moment a new tire which surprises them all (and not always pleasantly), and scramble for patching up continues.

Edited by Sakae

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Quote

The German broadcaster RTL quotes team boss Christian Horner as suggesting F1’s governing body struggled to stay on top of the “very complex” engine technology last year.

“I think the FIA does not have the expertise that the teams have,” he said. “So it was extremely important for us to have clarity for 2020.”

Hmm, only last year? I thought it was obvious for much longer than that. [/smug off]. It would be nice to hear from Mr. Horner from where that desirable clarity is suppose to come, Maybe FiA attending summer university make up courses, or even better, from competing teams advising FiA how to scr** Ferrari? BTW, where was Mr. Horner with his "concerns" when Mercedes sat so far in the front, that a season was decided in January before first race lights went off? Paddock politics at its best?

Edited by Sakae

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Honda are "far ahead of Ferrari" in terms of development

Sounds ominous. I wonder what Ferrari and McLaren do think of it right now.

Honda turning down Alonso for Indy 500 sounds like a beautiful return on a tennis court between two protagonists, instead old friends. After sitting on a beach chair by the track, talking about F2 engine power, etc. It is now backfiring on all cylinders. True or not, more importantly, there is certain line of decency one should not cross as he did vis a vis Honda, despite being fed tonnes of money at the same time. Karma is a biat** Mr. Alonso.

Even today I am convinced it has taken Honda so long to catch up, because of regulations restricting on track testing and validation of CA is consequently more difficult.

Edited by Sakae

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