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Autumnpuma

Alonso's Driving

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When they put tires now they are not hard cold, like it used to ;before early 90s the tires are warmed for several hours. So even is not race temperature they are already heat up, up to 100 C and always kept under close monitoring by enginers, so is much easier now to control the car. Tires used to need 2-3 laps to have the at race temperature or do those zig zags.

I will quote you next yr when nando falls to the midgrid.

It still too early to say nando is a great driver, people use to say this about JV look at what he is doing now.

Edited by QWERTY

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When they put tires now they are not hard cold, like it used to ;before early 90s the tires are warmed for several hours. So even is not race temperature they are already heat up, up to 100 C and always kept under close monitoring by enginers, so is much easier now to control the car. Tires used to need 2-3 laps to have the at race temperature or do those zig zags.

I will quote you next yr when nando falls to the midgrid.

It still too early to say nando is a great driver, people use to say this about JV look at what he is doing now.

Thank you for stating the obvious in regards to the tyres. However, even with warmers, Alonso's exit from the pits and immediate fight for position with a car going full-speed on fully-heated tyres is an impressive feat.

Alonso surely will be mid-pack at some point. I trust as you are quoting me when that happens, you will also give due credit to Alonso's more frequent front-running?

EDIT: You show your lack of knowledge about JV with your last sentence. If you had watched JV's total career, you would have more respect for his talent. Good drivers don't lose talent simply because they are in horrible cars/teams.

Edited by Autumnpuma

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Interview with Alonso by Anne Giuntini in L'Equipe, 13th June 2005 (Also in Formula 1 Yearbook 2005-2006 which is where I copied them from)

-It seems you have a very special driving style, one that's a bit staccato?

I don't realise it at the time but you can see it on the telemetry read-outs. I think it's also my way of coping with certain characteristics of the car. I also drove a Jaguar and a Minardi and I did not do the same things. It's true i'm the only one to use my steering wheel that way and it allows me to control understeer more easily. I come straight into a corner (he mimes by tightening his thumb and his index finger with his other fingers raised as if he is holding the wheel at the tips of his fingers) and then I adjust seeking the ideal balance with little movements of the wheel.

-It appears that some of the team members have done some karting with you - even the best - can't manage to follow your trajectories. So you're inimitable?

(He laughs) No, no I don't think so. All drivers have their own style. I think that I start turning in a little bit later than the others and I always try to come out very quickly.

Those who attempt to do the same sometimes miss the apex. If I try to copy their style then I'll miss the apex too and I'll come out of the corner very badly. It's not my style to turn in to a bend early. We've all got our own thing.

-In general do you adapt to your car or do you like to dominate it?

Every lap of the track is new. And each time the driver has to adapt to the way the car behaves during the lap. It is true that occasionally you have to force the car, master it. If for example you find you've got a lot of understeer you have to hit the brakes to compensate for it on the entry to a corner to load up the front tyres. You have to be aggressive with the accelerator to make the car break away a little and then straighten it up for the exit. In this type of situation you know you're being hard on the tyres and on the car when you use the kerbs. You don't think you're a great driver but you don't always have a choice. On the other hand when the car is easy to drive it's just sheer delight. When it answers to what you want, when it does exactly what you expect then it's just great fun. This is generally when you set the fastest lap in the race or do a blinder in qualifying

Race start's (whole first lap and not just off the line), Michelin intermediate's, restart's after safety car, any other situation where tire's are not up to optimal temperature and giving everyone understeer Alonso has and consistantly get's the better of anyone around him. As an Alonso fan I can't wait for the single tire supplier, slick's, no traction control, no tire warmer's, anything else to make the driver's car's more tricky to drive...Alonso makes the least mistakes of any driver so has the most to benifit from it :king:

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Interview with Alonso by Anne Giuntini in L'Equipe, 13th June 2005 (Also in Formula 1 Yearbook 2005-2006 which is where I copied them from)

Race start's (whole first lap and not just off the line), Michelin intermediate's, restart's after safety car, any other situation where tire's are not up to optimal temperature and giving everyone understeer Alonso has and consistantly get's the better of anyone around him. As an Alonso fan I can't wait for the single tire supplier, slick's, no traction control, no tire warmer's, anything else to make the driver's car's more tricky to drive...Alonso makes the least mistakes of any driver so has the most to benifit from it :king:

Interesting insights to young Fernando's style.

:thbup:

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Player(1) I just noticed your sig! :thbup:

On your quote of Alonso's. I have been posting the same thoughts on his style and have been persecuted as knowing nothing, now Alonso justifies me. Thanks for the post!

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Thank you for stating the obvious in regards to the tyres. However, even with warmers, Alonso's exit from the pits and immediate fight for position with a car going full-speed on fully-heated tyres is an impressive feat.

Alonso surely will be mid-pack at some point. I trust as you are quoting me when that happens, you will also give due credit to Alonso's more frequent front-running?

EDIT: You show your lack of knowledge about JV with your last sentence. If you had watched JV's total career, you would have more respect for his talent. Good drivers don't lose talent simply because they are in horrible cars/teams.

JV is just your average driver, he won his WDC because his car was so much better and he had a lousy team mate at that time. If Hill were there he wouldn't be the WDC of 97. And if he worth anything more than your average driver he would do much better at BMW, BAR...

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JV is just your average driver, he won his WDC because his car was so much better and he had a lousy team mate at that time. If Hill were there he wouldn't be the WDC of 97. And if he worth anything more than your average driver he would do much better at BMW, BAR...

If not for rookie mistakes, JV would have won his WDC in his rookie year. He was very close and proved faster than Damon on more than one occasion.

In his second year, he was not fighting the other teams for the WDC, but rather his own team. Patrick Head was throwing the weight of Williams behind Frentzen. Despite that, Jacques won the WDC, largely through outsmarting Patrick.

When he was at BAR, Honda were struggling with their engine and they didn't have a top aero guy. Through JV's input, Honda was able to construct a better engine. BAR finally looked good when they hired Geoff Willis and had the more dependable Honda engine.

At Renault, his engineers gave high praise to Jacques for his technical feedback. Funny how the team has been quoted as saying the 2004 car was hard to handle and after Jacques' stint with the team that year they suddenly produced a ballanced car for 2005.

At Sauber, the team was notorious for trusting the computer and windtunnel models to achieve car ballance. After many weak-willed drivers just taking what Sauber gave them and driving, Jacques stood up and started speaking out. He fought for more control over car set-up and subsequently taught the midfield team a thing or two about car ballance. It's also no coincidence that BMW have jumped a few places since last year with Jacques aboard.

One could certainly point to a whole slew of other factors to explain this, but the common thread in each of those teams' sudden advances has been the employment of Jacques. I await your learned response, hopefully consisting of more than three sentences...

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If not for rookie mistakes, JV would have won his WDC in his rookie year. He was very close and proved faster than Damon on more than one occasion.

In his second year, he was not fighting the other teams for the WDC, but rather his own team. Patrick Head was throwing the weight of Williams behind Frentzen. Despite that, Jacques won the WDC, largely through outsmarting Patrick.

When he was at BAR, Honda were struggling with their engine and they didn't have a top aero guy. Through JV's input, Honda was able to construct a better engine. BAR finally looked good when they hired Geoff Willis and had the more dependable Honda engine.

At Renault, his engineers gave high praise to Jacques for his technical feedback. Funny how the team has been quoted as saying the 2004 car was hard to handle and after Jacques' stint with the team that year they suddenly produced a ballanced car for 2005.

At Sauber, the team was notorious for trusting the computer and windtunnel models to achieve car ballance. After many weak-willed drivers just taking what Sauber gave them and driving, Jacques stood up and started speaking out. He fought for more control over car set-up and subsequently taught the midfield team a thing or two about car ballance. It's also no coincidence that BMW have jumped a few places since last year with Jacques aboard.

One could certainly point to a whole slew of other factors to explain this, but the common thread in each of those teams' sudden advances has been the employment of Jacques. I await your learned response, hopefully consisting of more than three sentences...

I've followed JV's carrier since the beginning, All the work you claim that he has done to BAR or Sauber hasn't done any good so far. Why is that during his first years he was so good at Williams given that he had the best car but couldn't do much later on at BAR or Sauber. He didn't give any feedback to Williams yet he still surprised his rookie year and win the WDC a year after. That gives you an idea of his feedback on the car don't do much good.

All JV has done in his F1 career is sit in a winning car and take the championship with some fighting against MS. But MS took a mid grid team as Ferrari to their success that is something different. I'm just saying that JV is not competitive in a mid grid car and hasn't prove he is worthiness during later on his career.

I'm not a JV hater, but i think people praised him too high. Sure he is a driver above the average F1 grid, but has gone downhill, he did nothing at Renault which was a car much better than BAR, he keeps rear ending other drivers for no reason. JV vanished into the ether after 97 and hasn't changed 9 yrs later. He will never be in the same league as Hill, Hakkinen, Alonso.

Only JV has is a big mouth, he says no one will remember MS but he doesn't even remember his own father Gilles, which wasn't such a bad driver. He is there to teach lessons on how to be a good human being but he sure isn't one because he can't remember his own father.

All this facts makes him a driver to be forgotten in the F1 history.

Edited by QWERTY

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I wouldn't hold my breath Mike.

After reading his post, I would agree. He did use alot of sentences though (I'm just kidding with you, QWERTY, don't go ballistic... ;) )

QWERTY: You didn't really disprove what I was saying, in fact, your statements could be answered by the post of mine you were responding to. You said you followed JV, but your comments prove you have just read the press reports about him. Also, when you said Gilles 'wasn't such a bad driver' you lose alot of credibility with me, and I would assume, others.

Edited by Autumnpuma

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After reading his post, I would agree. He did use alot of sentences though (I'm just kidding with you, QWERTY, don't go ballistic... ;) )

QWERTY: You didn't really disprove what I was saying, in fact, your statements could be answered by the post of mine you were responding to. You said you followed JV, but your comments prove you have just read the press reports about him. Also, when you said Gilles 'wasn't such a bad driver' you lose alot of credibility with me, and I would assume, others.

If you had so much credibility you should write your own journals for a F1 magazine.

Bah'

Edited by QWERTY

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