DOF_power

Standard Ecu: The Loss Of Biggest Electronic Nanny, And It Ain't Tc.

15 posts in this topic

So while everyone was complaing about TC ...

More than just the loss of traction

http://en.blog.ing-renaultf1.com/en/index....raction-control

The media have been talking a lot about the disappearance of traction control in 2008, and have tried to evaluate its impact on next season’s performances. They very often forget to mention the loss of another electronic driver aid that is at least as important: the EBS (engine braking system).

When a car comes into a corner the biggest risk of a spin under heavy braking comes from locking up the rear wheels. In this case, there is no miracle remedy to regain control of the car. For several seasons the engineers worked on a way to increase performance with a system that optimised deceleration, while reducing the risk of locking up at the rear.

The first fruitful attempt was an entirely mechanical one. A spring placed on the master cylinder delayed the action of the callipers when the driver hit the brakes. It was an efficient solution but not flexible enough. The design offices went back to work and came up with a fully electronic system called EBS. Thanks to the sensors on the rear wheels the ECU was able to detect the first signs of locking up. When this happened the engine was immediately ordered to accelerate a little to avoid an off-track excursion. This philosophy became generalised to the extent that seeing smoke coming from the tyres under heavy braking became very rare.

This reliable and efficient device can no longer be managed by the 2008 common ECU whose functions have been reduced. The EBS was discretely shelved after the Brazilian Grand Prix. It could make a comeback but this time as an entirely mechanical system, which would obviously be less efficient.

The absence of traction control, a crucial help under reacceleration, combined with the loss of the EBS, which is very important in the deceleration phase, is going to make the drivers’ lives even more difficult in 2008.

SAM MICHAEL EXCLUSIVE

http://www.itv-f1.com/Feature.aspx?Type=Ge...amp;PO_ID=41332

Quote:

ITV-F1.com: The two key elements from a drivers point of view is that there is more throttle control, but less engine braking. Which is the more significant?

SM: There is still engine braking, so when you lift off the throttle it's still there, and you have different throttle maps that you can apply to tune that.

The big difference is that there are no anti-lock systems. So under braking when you normally slam the brakes on you have got a rear anti-lock system that controls the rear-wheel slip. That's gone.

Probably the fact that we have lost ABS on the rear is the most significant.

The traction is still important as well and the driveability of the engine becomes a factor again, and you have got to listen to the drivers' input a lot more because he has got to feel the throttle's torque curve.

If you look at the effect it has probably been 40% on traction and 60% on braking.

Edited by DOF_Renault_BMW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm all for the display of driver skill. Hope we don't see too many crashes as a result. Minor offs will be good though. It's time the race (and quali) results were a little more mixed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>

^ I'm not an adept of driversport or "entertainment" . And F1's problems with the "quality of racing" stern from the measures done to "improve the quality of racing" witch turned out to be huge mistakes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Now for the most insightful post of my life:

I do not care :D

:lol:

Whatever spices up the show without killing them (the drivers) is good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:lol:

Whatever spices up the show without killing them (the drivers) is good.

Shut up, Boy George, what do you know?

F1 should be as bland as possible and the number of fatalities per race should be the same as number of kids per Mormon family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The FIA took a wrong turn somewhere, I have personally always believed that if the stupid restrictions on the undersides of the cars where removed, then F1 could move back towards the way it was in the past, with downforce being generated by ground effect, not by aerodynamic flipups. If they did that, and limited the amount of aero development on the bodywork, and lowered the front wing to the position it used to be in, the cars would be able to follow each other a lot more easily, and still generate enough downforce to give the drivers the confidence and grip they need

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the FIA had any brains they would realise that having more grip in corners would be a good thing, not a bad thing. I personally dislike what the FIA are doing, because they are over-sanitising F1 and making it boring in the process. I am all for safety, but it needs to be balanced with the need to put on a good show.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>

^ But FIA actually belived that grovees plus high front wing would be better for the show because supposebly we would have had "rain like conditions" in F1.

If that's not enough the 3.0 V10 era aero-drag combined with 2.4 V8 power works as an aero-brake thus reducing brake distances thus reducing/eliminating brake overtaking.

FIA should have NOT messed "to improve the quality of racing" in the first place.

Edited by DOF_Renault_BMW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
>

^ But actually belived that grovees plus high front wing would be better for the how because supposebly we would have had "rain like conditions" in F1.

If that's not enoug the 3.0 V10 era aero-drag combined with 2.4 V8 power works as an aero-brake thus reducing brake distances thus reducing/eliminating brake overtaking.

FIA should have NOT messed "to improve the quality of racing" in the first place.

Agreed. The FIA is one of the most hopeless organisations I've ever seen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not really sure how it's all going to be made best but these measures sound like a move in the right direction as far as entertainment and close-racing is concerned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>

^ I've been hearing about improving the quality of the racing since 1993, and the measures that FIA took only made things worse.

Somehow I doubt they'll fix it now.

Edited by DOF_Renault_BMW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would liken the FIAs attempts to improve F1 to a person trying to make a scented candle smell nicer by putting pig crap onto it. The FIA has a biased imbocile at its helm, and I just generally get the impression their management structure is really poor. The technology is there to make F1 really good, but the FIA are making it suck donkey balls.

Also, IIRC the raising of the front wing and the conversion to grooved tyres from slicks was to cut cornering speed, not produce wet conditions for racing. Removing front downforce from the car would not simulate wet conditions, because in wet conditions, you have a combination of variable Balance and Grip, and the car just generally slides around a lot more easily, and it would be nigh on impossible to simulate those set of circumstances by altering the mechanical setup of the cars.

The reason that wet racing is a lot more entertaining is simple. In the wet the aerodynamics of the cars have a far less significant impact, which enables the cars (despite the spray) to follow more closely and overtake each other. The easiest way to simulate that would be to put the old (pre 2005) aero regs in place with the old tyre regulations (before 1998 when slicks where allowed) and pre 1994 (before senna\'s death) undertray regulations. The result would be cars that produce a lot more mechanical grip, and can follow more closely without their front wings being upset by the other car\'s aero flow.

Edited by Silver_Arrows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now