Eric

16-0 Er..............18-1

50 posts in this topic

History has been made.

Now all we need is to crush Peyton's Pansies. Homefield advantage looks pretty good. 35 degrees in Foxboro sure ain't the Pansydome, Peyton.

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*

We beat the Jets cleanly in week 15.

The Jets' coach video taped BB in their playoff game in 2006, but BB didn't rat him out.

All coaches do it; it's an agreement among them that they don't rat them out, and everyone was surprised when they ratted out the Patriots.

The Colts cheated, too, pumping in crowd noise, and the Patriots still won.

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:lol: It's amazing how, despite being the Super Bowl being the most watched annual sporting event (and second most sporting event, behind the World Cup), and despite this being the biggest sports news in the world at the moment, no one knows what I'm talking about!

Simply: The 2007 New England Patriots are outstanding and broke a lot of records and the Colts didn't.

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:D Congrats!Enjoy whatever you're talking about :P

I'm American and I don't know what he's talking about either. :P

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:lol: It's amazing how, despite being the Super Bowl being the most watched annual sporting event (and second most sporting event, behind the World Cup), and despite this being the biggest sports news in the world at the moment, no one knows what I'm talking about!

Simply: The 2007 New England Patriots are outstanding and broke a lot of records and the Colts didn't.

I don't like those cars neither. They remind me of my -ex :meh:

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:lol: It's amazing how, despite being the Super Bowl being the most watched annual sporting event (and second most sporting event, behind the World Cup), and despite this being the biggest sports news in the world at the moment, no one knows what I'm talking about!

Funny that :D

My entire American Football knowledge comes from either The Simpsons or crappy American Football movies which ive been forced to watch for whatever reason. To me that sport makes as much sense a Kimi Raikkonen during a interview.

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Funny that :D

My entire American Football knowledge comes from either The Simpsons or crappy American Football movies which ive been forced to watch for whatever reason. To me that sport makes as much sense a Kimi Raikkonen during a interview.

:lol: Rudy wasn't crappy. It was the best movie we ever watched in school.

I'm passionate about American football, baseball, and hockey...though I have trouble watching the Bruins <_<

This is huge. Every year, someone becomes the "world champion" (technically it is the only professional American football league in the world, but I'm not sure about that term...fine with it in baseball and basketball, though...just not NFL and NHL hockey) by winning the Super Bowl, but it took 35 for someone to do another perfect season (winning every game, losing no games).

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:lol: Rudy wasn't crappy. It was the best movie we ever watched in school.

I'm passionate about American football, baseball, and hockey...though I have trouble watching the Bruins <_<

This is huge. Every year, someone becomes the "world champion" (technically it is the only professional American football league in the world, but I'm not sure about that term...fine with it in baseball and basketball, though...just not NFL and NHL hockey) by winning the Super Bowl, but it took 35 for someone to do another perfect season (winning every game, losing no games).

As some of you know im a HUGE Aussie Rules fan as in my opinion it is the greatest game in the entire world. It has been proven my serveral studies that AFL players are the fitest football (any code of Football) in the entire world as a midfielder has to run up to 12 miles per game. It is also the sport with the highest rate of ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) injuries in the world :D

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As some of you know im a HUGE Aussie Rules fan as in my opinion it is the greatest game in the entire world. It has been proven my serveral studies that AFL players are the fitest football (any code of Football) in the entire world as a midfielder has to run up to 12 miles per game. It is also the sport with the highest rate of ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) injuries in the world :D

All the NFL players on offense are fit, but the average is balanced by the big boys on defense...one Patriots player, Vince Wilfork, is 6'2" and 325 lbs. Granted, to say Vince doesn't work out is a lie, a lot of that 325 is muscle and bone.

For the record, AFL looks pretty cool...

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All the NFL players on offense are fit, but the average is balanced by the big boys on defense...one Patriots player, Vince Wilfork, is 6'2" and 325 lbs. Granted, to say Vince doesn't work out is a lie, a lot of that 325 is muscle and bone.

We were actually discussing this on the AFL forum i post on. Someone found a article talking about how high the rate of heart attacks is among defenders in American Football as they are morbidly obese. The article even suggested that the NFL should make a rule saying that no person may take the field if they have a BMI (Body Mass Index) of over 30.

For the record, AFL looks pretty cool...

Thanks. I really do love the sport, i do wish it was popular in other countries but i have accepted the fact that its not going to happen.

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We were actually discussing this on the AFL forum i post on. Someone found a article talking about how high the rate of heart attacks is among defenders in American Football as they are morbidly obese. The article even suggested that the NFL should make a rule saying that no person may take the field if they have a BMI (Body Mass Index) of over 30.

Thanks. I really do love the sport, i do wish it was popular in other countries but i have accepted the fact that its not going to happen.

Morbidly obese?! Far from it. Trust me, no one could live through a day of NFL practice if they were morbidly obese, or even obese. The big boys have heart attacks because they have to exert more to move because they weigh more, but that weight is not lard. I played football in high school, and one of my teammates was 270 lbs. He was big, yes, he had a large build, but he wasn't obese. He was large and had fat, yeah, but he was ridiculously strong.

Also, BMI is a lie. If you have a huge amount of muscle, as many athletes do, it'll screw up your BMI. For example, Arnold Schwarzenegger (butchered that one) has a BMI that indicates he is obese...

Take Patriot Wes Welker, for example. His BMI is over 27. Here is a picture of Wes (83):

welkerx.jpg

He is by no means in the overweight borderline obese category...that's all muscle. Welker is a beast, too. He plays offense, he's got great speed, etc. The guy next to him, Tom Brady, also has a BMI of over 27 (6'4" and 225). Calling Tom Brady overweight is ridiculous as he is insanely fit and the best QB in the NFL. He's also considered highly sexy; you wouldn't call an almost obese man highly sexy.

Yeah, personally I like the NFL being domestic. If the games were played all over the world, it would be harder for American fans to go to them...I know the NFL wants to expand, but I think it's not the best idea. They make so much money being what they are, but I can see what they're trying to do. Though, it won't get far if they really are trying. For example, Patriot Sammy Morris is British, yet most people don't know that; if they wanted an int'l following, they would probably promote guys like him more.

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Maybe they are all muscle when they are playing but as soon as they retire that muscle is going to turn straight into fat and then they will be dangerously overweight.

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Maybe they are all muscle when they are playing but as soon as they retire that muscle is going to turn straight into fat and then they will be dangerously overweight.

I highly doubt that. Your logic makes no sense and I will bet money that they will not be dangerously overweight. Muscle doesn't morph into fat if you stop doing hard exercise. You do realize that just by being alive you burn calories? If you eat right, you can get by not exercising. If anything, they will lose muscle and lose weight and become twigs unless they eat wrong, and honestly, if your on such a strict diet your whole career, I doubt you'll just give in and eat terribly. And eating fast food once a week is not eating terribly. It's hard to eat that terribly. For a 6'4" guy to weigh 225 in all fat is pretty hard to do, especially if you start as 225 of all muscle. The average 6'4" human doing little intentional exercise and just living (breathing, walking around a little, etc) who weighs 225 lbs could eat 2250 calories and not gain weight. No, I'm no expert and could well be wrong, but that's what I think. I eat more calories than my body weight times 10 and don't gain weight; though what you eat is also a big factor. Granted, I'm a lot more active than the average guy...

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Extra pounds cause trouble later in life

If you think yinz is fat, check out the Steelers' locker room.

While the NFL prides itself on fit and trim athletes, all but three of the 53 Pittsburgh players are clinically overweight, according to widely accepted federal health guidelines.

The plumpest pigskin players are offensive guard Keydrick Vincent, center Chukky Okobi and defensive tackle Casey Hampton. Their body mass index, a gauge of total fat, starts at nearly 41 -- about twice that of a person in the "normal" range.

Star running back Jerome Bettis might have run his way into the Hall of Fame, but at 5'11" and 255, he ate a path to a hefty 35.6 BMI. Rookie Ben Roethlisberger got his nickname honestly; with a BMI of 28.5, Big Ben is a little, well, big. In fact, every offensive and defensive lineman on the team isn't merely husky; they're clinically obese.

None of this surprises Dr. Derek Jones, physician to some of the NFL's elite athletes at the Ochsner Clinic in New Orleans. Being fat is part of the job description.

"Take any lineman. He's obese. People don't know about that, but they're fat," Jones said. "It starts at the high school level. They bulk up. By the time they get to the NFL, they're huge. But if they started losing weight, they'd get pushed over like a twig, and then they'll come in hurt."

And that's the reality of the NFL. Players must be huge to absorb jolts that would kill men of lesser stature.

"Just imagine stepping out 20 yards and then running full speed into a brick wall. That's what it's like," said offensive guard Milford Brown of the Houston Texans.

Brown weighs 316, and he couldn't do his job without the extra meat. In fact, most linemen agree to maintain the beefy bulk in their contracts. They're paid to eat.

But it wasn't always like that. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review analyzed every training camp roster from 1943, when the Steelers merged with the Philadelphia Eagles to become the Steagles, to the present Super Bowl contenders.

A typical Steelers guard in 1943 stood about 6'0" and weighed 219 pounds -- chunky, but not morbidly obese. A revolution in conditioning and nutritional supplements began to tip the scales in favor of plumper players in the 1990s. By 2003, a typical guard had grown 4 inches and packed on nearly 100 pounds.

That weight is Category III obesity, the worst form listed by physicians. These pros can expect increased risks for heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure later in life, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Sleepless nights

Many NFL lineman have more immediate medical concerns. A 2003 study directed by SleepTech Consulting Group of New Jersey discovered that 34 percent of NFL offensive linemen suffered from obstructive sleep apnea, a potentially deadly but often undiagnosed condition that stops breathing during slumber.

A medical examiner investigating the death of NFL great Reggie White said last week that the retired defensive end most likely died from inflammation of his lungs and heart, with sleep apnea a contributing factor.

The NFL apnea rate is five times that of the public. Researchers blamed it on the league's numerous plump players with thick necks. In addition to nights spent gasping for breath, pros reported impotence, high blood pressure, fatigue, depression, memory loss, headaches and intellectual deterioration.

But those extra pounds otherwise won't hurt game performance. A recent study by researchers at Gettysburg College and the University of Massachusetts found that excessive body fat doesn't hamper sprinting, jumping and pushing -- exactly what the NFL's beefy beasts are asked to do every Sunday.

For heavy men, that level of fitness can be reached only through year-round conditioning on the track and in the weight room.

"Conditioning is the big thing now. Players used to come to camp to get into shape, but now it's a full-time job," said Bob Milie, the Steelers' trainer through the Super Bowl years. "They come to camp in shape, and they keep themselves in shape. They have to."

If the players keep exercising like that and make fewer trips to the buffet after they leave the field, they can live longer and be healthier. A 1996 study by the National Football League Players Association found retired pros have normal mortality rates, as long as they lose the weight.

"If they keep exercising after they leave the game, they not only can lose weight, but the conditioning will help them with their injuries," said Kevin Guskiewicz, a former trainer for the Steelers. "The important thing is that they eat right and exercise."

Today, Guskiewicz directs the Center for the Study of Retired Athletes at the University of North Carolina. A 2001 report from his center found that three of five NFL vets exercised about four days a week, activity that helps lower body weight, body fat and blood pressure.

For about 40 percent of former NFL players, however, exercise can be tough, especially if they've suffered crippling bone or joint injuries. And it's not easy for many players to stop a pattern of heavy eating they've followed since high school, when they hoped their big bulk would attract college scouts.

By the time many linemen retire from the NFL, they've been packing the pounds for 10 years or more.

"When they're done with football, they're not getting a lot of money for being fat. But it's tough, after so many years, to lose the weight," Jones said.

http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburgh...l/s_291051.html

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Post what you want; journalism is subjective.

Sure, they're huge, but they aren't unhealthy. They are professional athletes. Sorry, but the morbidly obese could not survive this sport. They would sweat themselves to death in an hour. Again, BMI is a lie; it's irrelevant. The fact is, for the speed they have for their size, it shows that they are still fit and healthy.

Calling Ben Roethlisberger obese makes me laugh my a## off. Whoever wrote the article is such an idiot. Numbers like BMI lie. I end my argument there; the more articles you post, the sillier you'll look believing those lies. BMI is not accurate.

Yeah, maybe it will cause problems later in life, it all depends, but the majority do not have severe problems or even minor problems. I played football, and I didn't get fat when I stopped. No, I wasn't huge, but still.

To end it: I don't think the NFL needs to get involved or should get involved. If a player wants to lose their fitness when they retire, so be it. As long as a player is healthy enough to play in the NFL in their career, that's what will matter. The players may be clinically obese, whatever that means, but that doesn't mean they actually are. When these guys go to doctors, do you think the doctor says "wow, you are obese, lose weight!" **** no. There are body-builders who weigh over 300 lbs, are they obese? No way. Obesity isn't about size and weight; it's about lifestyle. If you lead an unhealthy lifestyle, you will have problems. Playing pro football is not an unhealthy lifestyle.

Edited by EKL

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Post what you want; journalism is subjective.

Sure, they're huge, but they aren't unhealthy. They are professional athletes. Sorry, but the morbidly obese could not survive this sport. They would sweat themselves to death in an hour. Again, BMI is a lie; it's irrelevant. The fact is, for the speed they have for their size, it shows that they are still fit and healthy.

Calling Ben Roethlisberger obese makes me laugh my a## off. Whoever wrote the article is such an idiot. Numbers like BMI lie. I end my argument there; the more articles you post, the sillier you'll look believing those lies. BMI is not accurate.

I do agree that BMI isnt a perfect system. Just out of curiosity how much running would a actual linebacker do during a game? I heard they only run flat out for about 4 seconds each play so im guess that they run flat out for less than 1 minute per game.

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I do agree that BMI isnt a perfect system. Just out of curiosity how much running would a actual linebacker do during a game? I heard they only run flat out for about 4 seconds each play so im guess that they run flat out for less than 1 minute per game.

I don't know, to be honest, but no, it would not be much. But running isn't the only form of physical activity, and also, game day is not the most physically demanding day. Practice and training is always a lot more demanding and physical than a game. A game you'll get hit harder, but in practice and training you work a lot harder.

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Here is a full AFL squad with their height and weight (ive also converted them to your archaic messurements system :D )

Number. Name - Height - Weight

1. Jared Crouch - 5,8 - 183

2. Amon Buchanan - 5,10 - 185

3. Kieran Jack - 5,10 - 172

4. Jarred Moore - 5,10 - 176

5. Nic Fosdike - 5,11 - 183

6. Brett Meredith - 5,11 - 181

7. Tim Schmidt - 5,11 - 185

8. Patrick Veszpremi - 5,11 - 187

9. Matthew O'Dwyer - 5,11 - 174

10. Ryan Brabazon - 6,0 - 161

11. Ben Mathews - 6,0 - 185

12. Jude Bolton - 6,0 - 185

13. Luke Ablett - 6,0 - 201

14. Leo Barry - 6,0 - 196

15. Paul Bevan - 6,0 - 187

16. Brett Kirk - 6,0 - 176

17. Mathew Laidlaw - 6,0 - 194

18. Jarrad McVeigh - 6,0 - 174

19. Daniel O'Keefe - 6,0 - 174

20. Kristin Thornton - 6,0 - 176

21. Nick Davis - 6,1 - 187

22. Nick Smith - 6,1 - 163

23. Luke Brennan - 6,1 - 196

24. Mathew Beckmans - 6,2 - 176

25. Aaron Bruce - 6,2 - 192

26. Dean Terlich - 6,2 - 183

27. Ryan O'Keefe - 6,2 - 198

28. Tadhg Kennelly - 6,2 - 198

29. Martin Mattner - 6,2 - 185

30. Michael O'Loughlin - 6,2 - 207

31. Nick Malceski - 6,3 - 183

32. Craig Bolton - 6,3 - 192

33. Peter Faulks - 6,3 - 165

34. Heath Grundy - 6,4 - 214

35. Ted Richards - 6,4 - 209

36. Ed Barlow - 6,4 - 207

37. Adam Goodes - 6,4 - 212

38. Barry Hall - 6,4 - 220

39. Lewis Roberts-Thomson - 6,4 - 212

40. Brendon Murphy - 6,5 - 194

41. Jesse White - 6,5 - 216

42. Henry Playfair - 6,6 - 220

43. Daniel Currie - 6,7 - 209

44. Darren Jolly - 6,7 - 231

45. Peter Everitt - 6,8 - 225

46. Jake Orreal - 6,9 - 205

What does the average NFL list look like?

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Many of those players have high BMIs, for what it's worth...

I'll give you the active Patriots roster:

Quarterbacks

12 - Tom Brady - 6'4"/225

16 - Matt Cassel - 6'4"/232

7 - Matt Guiterrez - 6'4"/231

Fullbacks

38 - Kyle Eckel - 5'11"/237

44 - Heath Evans - 6'0"/250

Runningbacks

33 - Kevin Faulk - 5'8"/202

39 - Laurence Maroney - 5'11"/220

Wide Receivers

80 - Troy Brown - 5'10"/196

10 - Jabar Gaffney - 6'1"/205

17 - Chad Jackson - 6'1"/215

81 - Randy Moss - 6'4"/210

18 - Dont

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Offensive Linemen

65 - Wesley Britt - 6'8"/320

71 - Russ Hochstein - 6'4"/305

77 - Nick Kaczur - 6'4"/315

67 - Dan Koppen - 6'2"/296

72 - Matt Light - 6'4"/305

70 - Logan Mankins - 6'4"/310

61 - Stephen Neal - 6'5"/305

68 - Ryan O'Callaghan - 6'7"/330

74 - Billy Yates - 6'2"/305

Those are some heavy b#####ds. Is Billy Yates able to walk?

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Those are some heavy b#####ds. Is Billy Yates able to walk?

More than...they can run. Not very fast. But they can run.

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More than...they can run. Not very fast. But they can run.

AFL and NFL are very different sports. Both sports have tackling but NFL is more about very sport bursts of power while AFL is about endurance. Im not sure if your aware of a endurance test called "The Beep Test" (or Multi-stage fitness test) but if a AFL player cant reach 15.0 then they are not fit enough to play and the coach wont select them in the first team whereas in NFL that level of fitness would just go to waste.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-stage_fitness_test

Edited by ykickamoocow

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