pabloh20

Guitarists!

170 posts in this topic

Ok, this is the first topic I have created - my virginity is broken, woohoooo!!! :D

I like most types of music, but I especially like all types of guitarists. Thought it would be a good idea to get a thread going as I am always interested in finding out about new/old guitarists that Ive never listened to or heard of. I would also be interested if you have seen them live, too.

I would just like to say now, no flaming other people's faves, please - music is very subjective!!! :D

Right, a few of mine for starters, there will be more to follow, no particular order :-

Joe Satriani - technically the best I have ever seen. The first concert I saw of his was mindblowing and I just watched mouth agape for the whole of it. Probably the best concert I have been to. Some of his style of music takes a little getting used to, though.

Eric Clapton - the man who inspired 'Clapton is God' graffiti and is probably still just about my fave, though he is towards the end of his long career. The Beano bluesbreakers album, Cream, Derek and the Dominos. I have seen him a few times in concert and I thought he was starting to wane, until I saw him on his last tour doing a lot of the old Doms stuff, truly incendiary playing at times. Probably the 2nd best concert I've been to.

Hendrix - what more needs to be said. He died before I was born so I can never get to see him play live, but no more needs to be said.

Angus Young (AC/DC) - the first guitarist I was into as a child (6 or 7 yrs old I think). Still love him, been to see ac/dc once in concert and it was fantastic and so, so loud!! Don't think anybody else does this type of guitar playing better than Angus.

Steve Vai - not really got a lot of stuff by him and some of it is a bit too 'out there' for me, but obviously he is up there with the best, similar mould to Satriani, actually Satriani taught him to play as well as Kirk Hammett, I think. Went to see him in concert as I thought I should do really, considering his talent, thoroughly enjoyed the concert and he is gifted, for sure.

Stevie Ray Vaughn - sadly deceased too, in a helicopter crash after a concert with Eric Clapton, Buddy Guy and Robert Cray, what a concert that would have been. Probably one of the closest to Satriani, in my opinion, for sheer technicality, but damn, does the music flow through him too.

Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top) - very economical, but very effective. Amazing in concert, slide playing was truly awesome.

Over to you............

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Steve Hackett - probably the guy who invented 'tapping'. Superb at creating atmosphere, and proof that good doesn't need to be fast. Also check out his classical compositions and performances.

David Gilmour - that sound!

Billy Gibbons? Of course, but I'd group him with Allen Collins and Gary Rossington of Lynyrd Skynyrd.

How about Django Reinhardt? Now there's a genius.

More as I think of 'em.

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George Harrison is probably under-rated because he was a Beatle (and couldn't write like Lennon/McCartney), but was an excellent guitarist with a hugely distinctive sound.

Clapton, IMO is over-rated. The only stuff of his that I rate is that with The Yardbirds and especially that with Cream.

And speaking of the Yardbirds, remember this is the band who, besides EC, also gave us Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page. :clap3:

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Brian May is an excellent guitarist. as is slash!

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Steve Hackett - probably the guy who invented 'tapping'. Superb at creating atmosphere, and proof that good doesn't need to be fast. Also check out his classical compositions and performances.

David Gilmour - that sound!

Billy Gibbons? Of course, but I'd group him with Allen Collins and Gary Rossington of Lynyrd Skynyrd.

How about Django Reinhardt? Now there's a genius.

More as I think of 'em.

I have never listened to Steve Hackett or Skynyrd, well not as far as I know, unless it's stuff I;ve heard and not associated with them. I'll have to check them out.

You'll hate me for this, but I was put off Floyd for a long time, MG, by having to watch The Wall in school, RE of all classes!! Took me a while to get past that, still not listened to a lot of their stuff, but I will get round to it.

A few more :-

Robert Johnson - love the story behind him. When you really listen to his stuff and remember it was before multi track recordings, it is quite impressive.

Jeff Healey - blind guitarist, not all blues guitarists called blind were actually blind!! :lol:

Bonnie Raitt - slide guitarist, not many women guitarists about, but damn she is sexy in concert and foul mouthed!! :lol:

Muddy Waters - good old Muddy, another slide guitarist and one who could verge into really heavy, overdriven sound which sounds fantastic on slide.

George Harrison is probably under-rated because he was a Beatle (and couldn't write like Lennon/McCartney), but was an excellent guitarist with a hugely distinctive sound.

Clapton, IMO is over-rated. The only stuff of his that I rate is that with The Yardbirds and especially that with Cream.

And speaking of the Yardbirds, remember this is the band who, besides EC, also gave us Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page. :clap3:

No dissing or flaming!! Clapton is not over rated, if you don't like him fine, but he is one of the very best, of that there is no argument. Sorry, end of. Nope, no arguing!! :D

Edit : - Thought I'd better edit the following to heed my own rules as it didn't read the way I meant it the first time :lol: ............

George, I can't decide about - he reckons he was hampered by the Beatle's decision to stop touring, so robbing him of valuable experimentation/practice time Proabably is under rated, though. What do you recommend listening to ?

Yep - 2 good guitarists with big followings for sure, though I have never really got into them as such. Jeff's Guitar Workshop is weird!! :lol: My brother is a big Zep fan, though.

Brian May is an excellent guitarist. as is slash!

Brian May is and built his own guitar too. Not listened to too much of Slash.

Edited by pabloh20

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Slash from Guns N Roses. Has done some excellent guitar solo's in his time. There are so many guitarists though but the ones I think of who are amazing have mostly been said already. Dave Gilmore has quite a distinct sound and is excellent too!

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Slash from Guns N Roses. Has done some excellent guitar solo's in his time. There are so many guitarists though but the ones I think of who are amazing have mostly been said already. Dave Gilmore has quite a distinct sound and is excellent too!

Sorry I didn't make that clear really, Jens. I know who he is and I've heard some of his stuff in Guns n Roses, but I've never listened to his solo stuff or anything.

Forgot to mention, Devilsinskirts, in case you didn't know - there are a few instrumentals done by Clapton & Page from around 1965. Quite raw recordings, some of them, but not too bad - Tribute to Elmore, Draggin' My Tail, etc

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oh i too have never heard his solo stuff but what he did in gnr is enough for me

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oh i too have never heard his solo stuff but what he did in gnr is enough for me

No problemo - don't mind some GNR stuff, actually. Wouldn't have minded going to a concert of theirs with the original band members.

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First and foremost for me is Frank Zappa, not because he was the most prophicient technically but because he was a master of mood and feel. If you listen to 'Willie The Pimp' on his 'Hot Rats' album (currently on my playlist) you will hear his incredible range. He never goes near the same lick twice in the space of ten minutes. He was incredibly dextrous and a brilliant composer. He demanded the very best out of his various 'Mothers' line ups over the years and inevitably they delivered. Not many are aware of this but Steve Vai was effectively Frank's apprentice, taking part in his '82 Mothers line up. Although Vai is much more of a stunt guitarist, you can hear Zappa all over his work.

I share Monza Gorrila's appreciation too of Steve Hackett. Underrated for many years, his solo work is well worth checking out. He will always hold a special place in the hearts of true Genesis fans because he brought a much needed level of agression and distinction to the group at a time when they were a bit meek and mild. Compare the pastural sound on their 1970 album 'Trespass' when he wasn't with them to the wonderful new found anger in 1971 with 'Nursery Cryme'. My favourite Hackett solo is on 'Firth Of Fifth' from the 'Selling England By The Pound' album. Hauntingly beautiful, it includes sections in minor key which create a melancholy feel and then ends on an optimistic note.

The tragedy of Jimi Hendrix's career was of course his untimely death at the age of 28 from 'suffocation due to barbiturate intoxication' (the official line on his death certificate) but also in my opinion the hype surrounding him and the pressure on him to perform his stunts (playing behind his back, with his teeth, amp fcuking and guitar burning) like a circus animal. Here was a very shy man who had a great talent for writing but ended up getting frustrated because no one was prepared to accept him unless he was being sensational.

His early work was raw and exciting (Purple Haze, Foxy Lady) but also showed maturity and sensitivity (Wind Cries Mary). By the time his third studio album had been released in 1968 'Electric Ladyland' he was experimenting with other musicians outside of his regular trio and using increasingly more elaborate sound effects. His yearning to move the game on was evident. It's a shame he didn't live throught this difficult period in his career because in my opinion, had he done so i think he could have delivered more great music. His incredible ability to play a guitar would have carried him through and it's this that has become his legacy.

When i have more time i would like to share with you my appreciation for Steve Howe, John Renbourn and others. Without wishing to sound like a musical snob i would like to thank Pabloh for starting this thread. Coming from the 'Westlife' one to this one is like being out in the cold winter rain and then coming home to a warm house, putting your feet up in front of the fire with a nice glass of red. I suggest we open this out to discuss our appreciation for all musicians, not just guitarists. How about Keith Emerson, Chester Thompson, Bill Bruford, Chris Squire.....

Edited by dribbler

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I suggest we open this out to discuss our appreciation for all musicians, not just guitarists. How about Keith Emerson, Chester Thompson, Bill Bruford, Chris Squire.....

:thbup: Excellent idea!

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jeff buckley is amasing if u can get grace is a gr8 album he is also an amasing singer

also matt belamy gr8 singer 2 but gr8 gitarist muse r maisin live

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jeff buckley is amasing if u can get grace is a gr8 album he is also an amasing singer

He was amazing, that was until he fell prey to the sea and all its secrets. If anyone is wondering where Thom Yorke got his sound, go and buy 'Grace', a delicious album.

Another poor gentleman who felt he couldn't cope with the strains of this unique planet of ours was Mr Nick Drake. As miserable as David Gray but with Drake you empathize because the pain seems (and obviously was) genuine. He released 'Five Leaves Left', 'Bryter Later' and 'Pink Moon' and then decided to go have a beer and write for St Peter. Only recently has he become truly recognised and appreciated, a wasted talent.

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First and foremost for me is Frank Zappa, not because he was the most prophicient technically but because he was a master of mood and feel. If you listen to 'Willie The Pimp' on his 'Hot Rats' album (currently on my playlist) you will hear his incredible range. He never goes near the same lick twice in the space of ten minutes. He was incredibly dextrous and a brilliant composer. He demanded the very best out of his various 'Mothers' line ups over the years and inevitably they delivered. Not many are aware of this but Steve Vai was effectively Frank's apprentice, taking part in his '82 Mothers line up. Although Vai is much more of a stunt guitarist, you can hear Zappa all over his work.

I share Monza Gorrila's appreciation too of Steve Hackett. Underrated for many years, his solo work is well worth checking out. He will always hold a special place in the hearts of true Genesis fans because he brought a much needed level of agression and distinction to the group at a time when they were a bit meek and mild. Compare the pastural sound on their 1970 album 'Trespass' when he wasn't with them to the wonderful new found anger in 1971 with 'Nursery Cryme'. My favourite Hackett solo is on 'Firth Of Fifth' from the 'Selling England By The Pound' album. Hauntingly beautiful, it includes sections in minor key which create a melancholy feel and then ends on an optimistic note.

The tragedy of Jimi Hendrix's career was of course his untimely death at the age of 28 from 'suffocation due to barbiturate intoxication' (the official line on his death certificate) but also in my opinion the hype surrounding him and the pressure on him to perform his stunts (playing behind his back, with his teeth, amp fcuking and guitar burning) like a circus animal. Here was a very shy man who had a great talent for writing but ended up getting frustrated because no one was prepared to accept him unless he was being sensational.

His early work was raw and exciting (Purple Haze, Foxy Lady) but also showed maturity and sensitivity (Wind Cries Mary). By the time his third studio album had been released in 1968 'Electric Ladyland' he was experimenting with other musicians outside of his regular trio and using increasingly more elaborate sound effects. His yearning to move the game on was evident. It's a shame he didn't live throught this difficult period in his career because in my opinion, had he done so i think he could have delivered more great music. His incredible ability to play a guitar would have carried him through and it's this that has become his legacy.

When i have more time i would like to share with you my appreciation for Steve Howe, John Renbourn and others. Without wishing to sound like a musical snob i would like to thank Pabloh for starting this thread. Coming from the 'Westlife' one to this one is like being out in the cold winter rain and then coming home to a warm house, putting your feet up in front of the fire with a nice glass of red. I suggest we open this out to discuss our appreciation for all musicians, not just guitarists. How about Keith Emerson, Chester Thompson, Bill Bruford, Chris Squire.....

When I went to see Steve Vai, he talked quite a bit about Zappa and his inamous quick wittedness. I have never thought much about Zappa influencing Vai because I came onto both Satriani and Vai at the same. Then I found out about Satch teaching 'Little Stevie' to play and so I always see the similarities between them.

By all means we can talk about other musicians, indeed talk about anything you like - musicians, singers, whatever, the only reason I started a guitarists thread is because it's dear to my heart!! :D As I say, I like most forms of music, though I don't like jazz - that's not to say I don't appreciate the talents involved, just that it doesn't really 'get me', if you know what I mean. The music I always come back to is blues/rock, especially blues - blues ain't nothing but a good man feeling bad :D

Anyway, a couple more to ponder, probably some highlighting my weird and wonderful tastes :-

Pete Green - there was some excellent stuff in early Mac, especially when combined with Jeremy Spencer

Joe Brown - been to see him a few times. Was ranked amongst the 3 best guitarists in the world at one time, by no other than Burt Weedon, along with Keith Richards and Hank Marvin. Joe can play a vast array of instruments including mandolin, slide, dobro, ukelele and violin. He actually taught himself to play violin in a week.

Eddie Cochran - one of the few pop stars who was allowed to play his own instrument when doing shows. Gave our own Joe Brown some advice which helped Joe on his way - use a 2nd string for the 3rd string, made it easier to bend.

Ritchie Valens - another life sadly robbed way before his prime, along with one of the other 'greats' of music, in my opinion, Buddy Holly. My Mum has been to see Buddy in concert - bet not too many people over here in the UK can say that!

Knopfler - probably one of the most popular. Somebody prominent (can't remember who) once said he plays the guitar all wrong, but it sounds so right. When his guy plays mellow it's as good as it gets, I think.

Edited by pabloh20

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Good gawd, Chuck Berry and his protoge Kieth Richards, they both have that sound. When the 'Stones' come out with a new track as soon as Kieth launches into the opening riff you know it's the Stones, same with Tommi Ioni of Black Sabath..............

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Ok, fellows put them in the order you liked much. Here my list:

As John Lennon once said: "...the only thing left to me is to play the guitar like BB KIng..." if he is not the best is the guitarist I enjoyed much more. God save Lucille!

I grew up in the `70 with symphonic rock and progressive rock so I must mention Jimmy Page, Steve Howe, Richie Blackmore, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, Steve Hackett, Jeff Beck,Gary Moore. I agree with Joe Satriani is fabolous!

Regarding other musicians Bill Bruford, Rick Wakeman, Greg Palmer, Keith Emerson (how can I forget when he played the Moog for the first time! It seems like and apollo 11 with less processing power than today cell phones): The best drummer I saw was (is) Jerry Marotta. he came to Argentina with Peter Gabriel... and wohhh!

Regarding Hackett did you hear the "Blood on the rooftops" intro? (From Genesis

Edited by Argento

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Ok, this is the first topic I have created - my virginity is broken, woohoooo!!! :D

Over to you............

My list comes from the kind of music I like to listen to, so there may be some exception taken by others who do not feel the same way, here goes nothing..... (not in order of merit)

Hendrix

Knopfler

Tommy Emmanuel

Clapton

Dave Murray

Slash

B B King

Santana

Satriani

Buddy Guy

Brian May

Page

Fogerty

Edit: Kirk Hammett

Edited by mock

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George, I can't decide about - he reckons he was hampered by the Beatle's decision to stop touring, so robbing him of valuable experimentation/practice time Proabably is under rated, though. What do you recommend listening to ?

I would recommend the album All Things Must Pass - all very subtle and mostly very beautiful.

No doubt, real Skynyrd fans will have a fit, but aside from their classics like Sweet Home Alabama, Tuesdays Gone and Free Bird, I would thoroughly recommend Gimme Three Steps as being a ****ing great song.

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Brian May is an excellent guitarist.

Indeed, Thats who would get my vote!

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Good gawd, Chuck Berry and his protoge Kieth Richards, they both have that sound. When the 'Stones' come out with a new track as soon as Kieth launches into the opening riff you know it's the Stones, same with Tommi Ioni of Black Sabath..............

Yep, been to see Chuckle Berry in concert too, enjoyed it, though he is quite arrogant. I would have loved to have seen the Stones in the early years, especially at the Crawdaddy club. Did you ever see the documentary were Keith sets up and plays in a band with Chuck, Doc ?

Ok, fellows put them in the order you liked much. Here my list:

As John Lennon once said: "...the only thing left to me is to play the guitar like BB KIng..." if he is not the best is the guitarist I enjoyed much more. God save Lucille!

I grew up in the `70 with symphonic rock and progressive rock so I must mention Jimmy Page, Steve Howe, Richie Blackmore, Frank Zappa, Eric Clapton, Steve Hackett, Jeff Beck,Gary Moore. I agree with Joe Satriani is fabolous!

Regarding other musicians Bill Bruford, Rick Wakeman, Greg Palmer, Keith Emerson (how can I forget when he played the Moog for the first time! It seems like and apollo 11 with less processing power than today cell phones): The best drummer I saw was (is) Jerry Marotta. he came to Argentina with Peter Gabriel... and wohhh!

Regarding Hackett did you hear the "Blood on the rooftops" intro? (From Genesis

Edited by pabloh20

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I would recommend the album All Things Must Pass - all very subtle and mostly very beautiful.

No doubt, real Skynyrd fans will have a fit, but aside from their classics like Sweet Home Alabama, Tuesdays Gone and Free Bird, I would thoroughly recommend Gimme Three Steps as being a ****ing great song.

:thbup:

Sweet George Harrison, while his guitar gently weeps :(

Yep, been to see Chuckle Berry in concert too, enjoyed it, though he is quite arrogant. I would have loved to have seen the Stones in the early years, especially at the Crawdaddy club. Did you ever see the documentary were Keith sets up and plays in a band with Chuck, Doc ?

Hell yes!! the master and pupil, the master taking Keith to task on how to play his signature riff, good stuff :thbup:

I'm a Stones aholic, my first was 1971 when Mick was still getting his Ya-Ya's out

Edited by pumpdoc

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Guitarists that i like...not in order of merit

Mick Taylor

Eddie Kirkland

Yngwie Malmsteen

Vivian Cambell

Eddie Van-Halen

Eric Clapton

Richie Blackmore

Jimmy Page

Jimi Hendrix

Jeff Beck

There is so many more.......

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